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on 27 April 2016
If I never hear the name Adam Rifkin again I think it'll be too soon, or the words giver and taker. Basically some words/people were over used. But overall I really enjoyed this book and felt like I got a lot out of it. It did make me feel guilty though as I'm pretty sure I'm a matcher and he left no real scope for them and didn't really explain much about them. It had nice themes of history, psychology and kindness- overall I would recommend this book
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on 1 September 2015
A great and very well written book with a good combination of interesting anecdote and research evidence. I have not seen much evidence based work on the effectiveness of networking : it is good to see that if you are very generous with your time and contacts that this is likely to enhance your career - provided you don't let yourself be used as a doormat.
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on 20 September 2017
Excellent read with great examples from a range of industries. Grant writes eloquently and reflects on the issues as if the reader is directly in dialogue with him.
Great tips and practical section and optimistic throughout.
As good if not better than originals!
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on 26 June 2017
Favourite psychologist
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on 31 May 2017
Just finished this book and highly recommend it.
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on 11 April 2017
I like this book.
For me the most interesting part of this idea is that as we get more connected via the internet the "givers" are coming into their own and we all are benefiting
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on 4 September 2017
Easy to read with great examples.
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on 29 August 2013
Adam Grant divides workers into givers, takers and matchers - and his research suggests that givers are in some cases the most effective workers and in other cases the least effective.

The book is full of stories of successful givers and tips on how to become a successful giver: look to sort out other people's problems and it will pay off (sometimes serendipitously), you will be better at HR decisions (you're not so determined to be right; you want what's best for other people and the organisation), you can be good at influencing (don't do this through a power play but through modesty - stammering can be helpful), and you can keep from burn-out through making sure you see the direct results of your giving and through 'chunking' it so it happens in big bursts and not through a drip feed of good actions. As to why some givers end up at the bottom of the heap, that's because they are 'selfless' rather than 'otherish' givers - that's to say, they don't set any boundaries and aren't good at asking for help for themselves. It's amazing just what people will do to help you - or others - if you ask them. And they'll be likely to go on helping once they start...

So far so good - and I certainly enjoyed reading this - it's persuasive and surprising.

If I felt less than 100% convinced, though, that's partly because Grant has so little to say about 'takers' (and yet he acknowledges they sometimes make the world go round - Michael Jordan is one example he quotes) - and on this, there are other books (Maccoby's book on narcissistic leaders, which points to the highs and lows of the taker in working life). It's also because he doesn't really go into what makes people 'takers' or 'givers' in the first place - is it a given or does it depend on what you learn in your family as you grow up about 'how we behave round here and what gets us what we want in this environment'?...Perhaps there will be a sequel..
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on 12 April 2013
I found about this new and exciting book via Dan Pinks blog, and immediately felt compelled to buy it. I am incredibly glad that I did, as the discovery couldn't have come at a better time for me.

I've battled for years with being a "selfless" giver in the software development field, and often experienced credit being stolen, burnout at numerous times, and a feeling of being taken advantage of. I've tried assertiveness and confidence tactics, but they just aren't the real me. I'd reached the point of being resigned to never giving my very best and holding back, for fear that others would take credit for my effort and ideas.

Then I read this book.

As I devoured each chapter, I felt I gained new insights into many areas of life - How I can give more at work without getting walked all over; how I can be a better husband and father; how I can use my knowledge to help others in a way that meets both our needs.

Through the fantastic prose and engaging stories I've come to understand that I can be a true giver in every dimension of life, and not suffer the same fate I have previously. I've gained a new sense of optimism about who I am, and what I can accomplish in life - I finally feel ready to share what I consider my life's work.

I hesitate to use the phrase "this book changed my life" as it is evangelistic and slightly over-used. However this is one of less than a dozen books that I confidently and happily say really has changed my life.

Thanks Adam.
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on 2 April 2015
Oh dear, another US-centric self help book where the rest-of-the-world does not exist.
Once you've waded through the long stories of various people you've probably never heard of, and pages and pages of NBA coaches and players, you might actually get to the core information which shows why 'givers' are more successful than 'takers'.
Apart from the above, the actual concepts provided were interesting and useful to me.
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