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on 15 September 2013
I must blame this book for keeping me up at night and giving me a reading hangover! This is a gripping and honest account of a man's career in the Met and his desire to be an undercover officer. The pace and tone is very engaging and I really liked the journey of his career from probationer to the last days of his time as an undercover cop.

The key to this autobiography is in the detail. The vivid descriptions of Soho and the types of characters they would meet and then his transition to working undercover and all that entailed kept me turning the pages on my kindle. Mr Plowman is quite candid about the mistakes he made but despite this, he was a good police officer who quite rightly should be angered at his shoddy treatment by the Met during the latter days of his career. The descriptions of some of his operations were very interesting and the types of characters he would meet but as shocking as the description of his operational engagement with a paedophile, which wasn't entirely surprising as one would expect them to be evil, it was the attitudes that pervaded the offices of SO10 and lack of compassion for their fellow officers that made me sympathise with Mr Plowman the most.

A gripping read with interesting details of an officer in the Met and definitely worth downloading.
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on 11 August 2013
I don't normally read autobiographies or non fiction, to me a book is about escapism not real life, however I read an extract of this book in the newspaper and as it was on offer I downloaded the rest. From the moment I started reading it I couldn't put it down, the writing is excellent and the author has thoughtfully kept jargon to an absolute minimum. I have recommended this book to friends and family as a great read and many are now reading it too. I really can't recommend this book highly enough.
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on 4 April 2017
Writing this has obviously been therapeutic for the author, but it is not really a compelling read. The stories about his undercover operations are pretty dull and seem rushed. It's just a detailed account of his drawn out mental breakdown punctuated with a few anecdotes.
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on 12 October 2017
brilliant book well worth the read
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on 4 May 2017
I loved this book. A really interesting insight into the met and the methods used.
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on 5 May 2017
All he seems to do is move from one team to the next and peeing his team off, nothing seems to happen to get the heart racing
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on 8 September 2015
Started off full of promise but really after about chapter 3 turns in to a book about a guy moaning about his job.
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on 7 September 2015
I bought this book under the false pretense that it was actually Karen Traviss' seminal, post apocalyptic, sci-fi romance; 'Crossing the Line'. I had completely finished the book before the realisation dawned on me that it was in fact, an entirely different Crossing the Line.

I enjoyed it nonetheless, however my only criticism would be that it does not contain nearly enough Centaurs, or shirtless, glistening romps on an Andromeda-like landscape, although the description of London's Soho would have you thinking otherwise.
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on 24 August 2013
A good book as much about what the MET did to the authors life as it is about UC work.
Well worth reading.
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on 5 October 2016
I think if you weren't in the police you might read this book with a bit of admiration for this guy.
if you are or ever have been (particularly the Met police) I'm sure you could understand and relate to some of the problems the author depicts here regarding gutless superior officers, clicky colleagues quick to drop you in the sh!t to kiss the arse of their inspectors, numb skull mentality of some of the heavier branches of the police and generally the scum you have to deal with on Londons streets.
For such an intelligent guy though (he learnt fluent Russian) I thought he should know the difference between burglary and robbery.
(You can't rob an empty hotel room).
Plus Chernobyl disaster was in 1986 not 1984.
I have read a few of these kind of books and of course people can't recall word for word exacting conversations from about 25 years ago.
However I wish when they do supposedly quote these conversations they wouldn't take influence from Guy Ritchie's early directorial work.
I work and live in central London for over 40 years now and people still do call you "Bruv, Chief, Guvnor, mate" the term "Innit" reels from people's tongues everyday from young old black brown and white and even the other day some old scouser kept calling me "Our Kid" despite never clapping eyes on me before.
Some of these terms the author claims have died out now but they're stronger then ever!!
Having said that I chuckled here and there and appreciated the sacrifices he made and felt the downbeat ending fitting but typical.
A friend of mine retired from the Met police and on his last few days and for a few days after people kept telling him how lucky he was. He always said it wasn't because of luck it was because of over 30 years service!!
Much like the author he walked away with a sense of anti climax.
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