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Random Access Memories
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£4.75+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 29 May 2013
I only really like the track get lucky, what a disappointment I wish I had taken notice of the other reviews :-(
3 people found this helpful
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on 29 May 2013
I'm sure its because of all the hype, but I'd expected a bit more from this album. Its very accomplished, but is basically a couple of good songs linked by some average filler - same as most other good albums, but not life defining.
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on 14 January 2017
While the vinyl pressing is good and this lp has some notable hits, overall it's too downtempo & mature for my liking. It's barely EDM, and more along the lines of operaesque ballads with some daft punk style thrown in. It's worth buying, but don't expect much.
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on 25 April 2014
For a long time, I have loved the music of Daft Punk and gathered some people together that were up for seeing them the next time they played live where ever in the world, fortunately I purchased this and it has saved me spending more money and sad ears. This truly is bad music, not just bad but boring. I imagine this is to appeal to the listeners of Neil Young, but not the good Neil Young, the safe stuff you might here coming from the speakers of your local bank or supermarket. There was one tune I had listened to a few times and liked but will not bother looking at the name of said tune as this will waste more time as when listening to the album. I would suggest buying it for Daft Punk fans that were in coma’s when Daft punk was good, may anger them just enough.
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on 28 June 2013
Really really love daft punk normally but this is a total let down. The only reasonable track is the single... sorry :(
2 people found this helpful
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on 21 September 2013
Two songs were goodish. I wouldn't have spent the money if I knew the music was quite boring. . .
4 people found this helpful
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on 28 June 2013
I was expecting a Daft Punk album with analog production, but in the end it consists of a lot of empty tracks that doesn't connect with each other.
2 people found this helpful
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on 5 June 2013
I got into Daft Punk after their Tron Soundtrack which had exquisite arrangement and a real range of style. I then bought this album to see what their style was like without being attached to a movie.

I was not dissappointed.

The album is an assortment of styles and sounds from 70's disco, through some Progressive Rock, funk, soul and boogey woogey (spelt wrong??) too.

If you like eclectic, buy this album.

If you are looking for something a bit out of the ordinary, but still very hip, buy this album.

If you enjoy appreciating sheer musical talent, buy this album.

Plus, at over 70 minutes long - it is also very good value for money :-)
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on 23 May 2013
This album was clearly constructed - consciously or subconsciously - to entice a more general audience, at which, in this respect at least, they've succeeded if the bulk of excited reviews are anything to go by. But history has shown, time and again, that a band should never capitulate to this. When I listened to it, all I heard was an unholy amalgam of George Benson-meets-Kraftwerk-meets-Yes. There really are keyboard flourishes on here horribly redolent of 1970s' Rick Wakeman-style prog rock, which only succeeded in alienating me further from its already arch slickness. Only tracks 3 and 4 harboured the kind of unexpected warmth I'd hoped might pervade the rest of the recording. The rest I could easily live without. Such a shame. The future of dance? I don't think so.
3 people found this helpful
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on 6 June 2013
It's not often that the word 'masterpiece' is used correctly. I'm almost 30 years old, and in living memory I can only really see it applying to a handful of albums. Discovery, Daft Punk's second album being one of them. But in the instance of Random Access Memories, it doesn't even begin to cover what the duo, and their named collaborators have achieved here.

First off, aside perhaps from the overplayed-but-still-brilliant 'Get Lucky', this isn't an instant album. You need to work at it, listen to it, digest it. And following the work you'll put in, the rewards will come, and they will keep on giving. This album is a massive middle finger up to the throwaway instapop that dominates mainstream music charts - perhaps a movement Daft Punk themselves are a little guilty of encouraging, albeit not necessarily conciously.

RAM isn't clamouring for attention, and it's not desperate for praise. It's intelligent, considered, measured and very, very well recorded. Self-indulgent? Quite the opposite. The overall impression I get from the album is one of respect for both the listener, and for those pioneering musicians who made the original music that laid the foundation for Daft Punk's very own existence. The only things that Daft Punk have made matter on this album are the music, and suitable recognition for the artists who made it possible.

Try and imagine a time before iTunes, YouTube, Spotify et al; put down, or better still, turn off your smartphone; sit down and disconnect from the world around you, and concentrate on something worthy of your uninterrupted attention. Random Access Memories provides a moment of real in a world of virtual.

If you don't understand what this album is trying to do, then I suspect you probably don't really understand what Daft Punk have spent the last two decades trying to do, either.
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