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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
58
4.0 out of 5 stars
Format: Blu-ray|Change
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on 21 May 2017
Excellent! Woerth Getting!!
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on 13 June 2017
Please put paper or something to hold The dvd Down, The dvd was scratch
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on 19 October 2015
Excellent addition to my collection. Delivery & service 1st class, i'm very pleased.
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on 12 August 2015
a good british movie
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on 7 November 2015
A must for Peter cushing fans
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on 7 November 2016
Well pleased
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on 30 November 2016
Very good.
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on 23 June 2016
Quick delivery. Great item. Interesting film.
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on 7 March 2009
Produced in 1963, when Hammer were concentrating just as much on contemporary thrillers and children's adventure films as they were on their more noted gothic horror output, Freddie Francis' The Evil of Frankenstein is one of the company's most problematic movies, and also one of their least popular horror films. A wrong-headed attempt to repeat the box office success of their first two Frankenstein pics, this effort displays none of their inventiveness, brashness, or jet-black humour. With both original director Terence Fisher and screenwriter Jimmy Sangster absent, the film's script totally ignores both the plots of Hammer's two earlier Frankenstein movies, and the previous characterisation of the title character by Peter Cushing. Francis' flick has far more in common with the Universal Frankensteins of the 1930s and 40s (note the huge laboratory set, lumbering monster, and het up villagers as three examples), and as a result, the movie remains by far the least impressive and least enjoyable of Cushing's six appearances in the role of Baron Victor Frankenstein, who is here a whining, exhausted-looking bore, and nothing at all like the cold, calculating anti-hero of Fisher's films. With such names as Jack Asher (Director of Photography), Bernard Robinson (Production Designer) and James Bernard (Composer) also missing from the credits, it is safe to say that this dull, stale film was certainly the work of Hammer's `B-team', and it shows.
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on 5 February 2017
Are you joking Frankenstein? This is a pleasingly big budget movie with the refugee Baron coming home to a right old knees up with crowds thronging the little town.

Cushing keeps the whole thing moving - the monster never really convinced me but the laboratory scenes with masses of electrical equipment is really impressive.

There is no attempt to emulate or compete with the iconic final scenes of fire of the earlier iconic black and white movie of the 1930s starring Boris Karloff. They will never be surpassed.

This is all about the star Peter Cushing and the strange combination of inimitably English gentleman cast into middle European cold blooded demon which makes his portrayals so addictive.

Perhaps "nothing happens" until Cushing turns up!
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