Learn more Download now Browse your favorite restaurants Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Learn more Learn more Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more



on 12 April 2018
I had always thought of the Anne of Green Gables as children's books. They are not. The author is brilliant at helping the reader see the world through the eyes of children. She has the rare gift of making a thoroughly good character, Anne, interesting and complex. Anne's resourcefulness had me in tears on many occasions.

Through the series we see Anne grow up and have children of her own and experience and cope with life's ups and downs.The author loves her characters and Prince Edward Island. The latter is almost a character in the books. Her descriptions of the island and its woods, flowers and fields are lyrical and poetic.There might be a bit too much of this for some modern readers but it is a price well worth paying for some beautiful stories and eloquent writing.

I loved it.
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 28 August 2017
The new & perhaps rather superfluous edition of the Anne Shirley novels are sturdy, with good size type. Some - this one, "Windy Willows" & "Green Gables" itself - have stunningly attractive cover artwork, but on the whole I think the rather more expensive rival new set from Tundra wins aesthetically. The book itself is one of the better ones in the series, where Anne is still single, has some spark & hasn't yet declined into the dull matriarch of the later stories! It's also a surprisingly dark & melancholy read at times. There are a lot of sunsets described, three deaths & a near-fatal illness that inspires superb writing from Maud Montgomery.
There's humour, too, but it is very clearly the end of a trilogy & although Anne's future seems to be mapped out, it's goodbye to her childhood & adolesence. I don't think Montgomery intended to write about her again, but a conspiracy of readers & publishers ensured there were 5 or 6 "Anne" books to come. But this is one of very best.
|0Comment|Report abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 10 February 2016
The second in the Anne series, this was written in a hurry because the publishers were clamouring for a sequel to the immensely successful 'Anne of Green Gables.' As a result, LM Montgomery used material she had already written into various short stories and the first chapter opens with such a tale. It is all very charming, if not quite as compelling as the first novel. In the sequel, the Anne is now16 and becomes the teacher at Avonlea school. Many beloved characters from 'Anne of Green Gables' appear again, as well as new ones. Mr. Harrison takes the farm next to Green Gables and his eccentric behaviour enlivens Anne's life. She meets (and loves) middle-aged Miss Lavendar Lewis and becomes deeply interested in her eventual destiny.Paul Irving is her most promising pupil and kindred spirit and twins Dora and Davy enter her life with humorous and heartwarming results. Anne is maturing but still has her great ideals and her innocent appreciation of the simple values of life, of nature and of the power of imagination. She is becoming a beautiful woman, as well as a clever one. During the two years covered by this book, she learns many life lessons, grows wiser and learns how to influence the lives of her pupils for good. Yet she resists full womanhood, preferring to cling to her childhood joys and values. Nevertheless, she is beginning to take her place in the adult world, as village teacher and founding member of the Avonlea Village Improvement Society, which works to improve the way that Avonlea is kept by it occupants, with many setbacks.
There is a delicious, homespun quality to these books. Montgomery writes about her characters with great affection, so that we are inclined to love them too. She herself grew up on Prince Edward island in Canada, in somewhat difficult and emotionally repressive circumstances, and she draws on her experiences in this series. It would be amazing if a child who has been as deprived as Anne in her early years were not emotionally damaged by it. Yet she is as much a lady as if she were brought up in a privileged household. It is all a bit hard to swallow, but if one suspends disbelief on this point, the stories are delightful and unforgettable. They were written in an age when people still believed in moral self-improvement and the moral vision expressed in them is both moving and inspiring. Loved it!
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 28 February 2016
A beautiful book all through! I'd heard of it, of course, but never read it, even as a child, or seen any of the films. So when I saw it listed, it was the chance of a lifetime. It is a wonderful story, about a freckled, red-headed, lonely orphan girl of eleven, blessed (or some would say, plagued) with an endless imagination. This part of her make-up allows her to bear many disappointments and ill treatments. Then a small mistake sends her to an elderly brother and sister, the Cuthberts, who originally planned to adopt a boy. But they change their minds after Anne arrives, which changes her life (and theirs) forever. A funny, heart warming story, (even tearful, I have to admit) I couldn't put it down once I'd started it. Wonderful story, well worth the read! Had to wait a long time to read it, never had it as a child, though had hundreds of my own, & nearly 70 now! Think I may read the sequels too.
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 10 February 2016
Wonderful, luminous account of how young orphan Anne Shirley is brought to Prince Edward Island in Canada by mistake, to be fostered by an elderly brother and sister who had asked for a boy. She is sent to Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, who were unaccustomed to children and felt no need of any, but needed a boy to help them on their farm. Anne's innocent enthusiasm and heart-hunger captures Matthew from the start, though Marilla takes a little longer to learn to love the charming, lonely child. The novel describes how she learns to love them and the island and overcomes prejudice to succeed in her new life.
Written in 1908 by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery, this is a magical novel. Although often considered to be a children's novel, and very satisfying to children, it is a great read whatever one's age. It reflects the values of a simpler age. Strongly moral and rooted in traditional values, it is not at all pious or preachy but rather exposes right and wrong in simply telling the story.
Apparently. over 50 million copies of this story have been sold, translated into 20 languages. There are many sequels, all charming but none quite matching up to this first book. It is required reading in many a school reading list. I can understand that - I loved it!
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 30 August 2017
Having seen two television adaptations [ a recent one on netflix ] i wanted to read the book.Although its obviously a childrens /teen book i still found it immensely enjoyable and very different from the TV adaptations.The descriptions of Prince Edward island Canada are so vivid it makes one want to go there ,Its a gentle enjoyable coming of age story and i will definitely buy more in the series
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 13 July 2015
This is the fourth book in the "Anne of Green Gables" series and carries the story of Anne some way forward. Anne - as well as Gilbert and others - is now studying at Redmond College. We read about her experiences starting as a Freshman and living in a boarding house with lots of cushions that must be taken care of! We are introduced to a real character of a girl, Philippa - a rich, seemingly irresponsible, but very likeable girl, who comes to board with Anne and Anne's friend Priscilla. Anne is faced with her first proposal - by proxy! And then comes another from Charlie Sloan who has his pride pricked when Anne refuses. Anne's life at Redmond goes on - she and friends come to rent a delightful house called Patty's Place with some more appealing characters. Then Anne meets a man - seemingly the man of her dreams - but in the end she comes to realise which man she really does love - the man who has loved her for so many years - Gilbert!
However, there is much more to "Anne of the Island" than romance. Anne spends some time in Avonlea, where Davy Keith in particular brings some comedy into Anne's life. We read about the day that Davy makes his sister Dora play truant from Sunday School with him - and what happens! Then there is the story of "Averil's Atonement" - the serious novel that, to Anne's horror, becomes a baking powder advertisement! Real tragedy looms when Ruby Gillis is unable to accept that she is dying of consumption - at last Anne is able to help her. And there is much, much more! This is a excellent book, especially for those who know and love other Anne books.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 13 July 2015
This is a very good audio version of "Anne of Green Gables". It is a "full cast dramatization", rather than a reading of the book, and it is good to listen to this new version, which is very close to the original book and misses nothing of any importance. We hear about Matthew Cuthbert meeting - not the boy he had expected, to help with the farm, but a girl - a girl with real character, who really appeals to him. His sister Marilla is slower to accept this young girl with fiery hair and a fiery temper - but a heart of gold - but she does. We hear what happens when Anne meets the opinionated middle-aged Rachel Lynde - and later on how she has her first, never to be forgotten, spectacular encounter with Gilbert Blythe when she really loses her temper with him! We hear about how her friendship with Diana starts - how it ends in disaster after Anne confuses raspberry cordial with currant wine and Diana arrives home intoxicated - and how the friendship is renewed after Anne saves Diana's baby sister's life. We hear how Gilbert saves Anne from drowning - yet she still doesn't want to be friends with him - yet! We hear about how Anne falls off a roof - and there is much, much more! "Anne of Green Gables" is a great book with both serious parts and funny parts and this CD set is an excellent version of it, with various actors and actresses reading their parts well so that we really feel we are in the story as we listen to it.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 6 November 2013
I first read Anne Of Greengages as a child about seventy years ago. It was my sisters book and I have always remembered how much I enjoyed the book. I have always wished to read it again but thought it would no longer be in print.. I am only half way through and must say it is a really lovely story to read. No drama and no sex and I shall be so sorry when I reach the end. The story is told with such charm that you just imagine every word that little Anne speaks. I would recommend this story to everybody lt is so well written although having said that maybe the gentlemen amongst us would find it too childish.

Hope you will find it as enjoyable as I am. Heather Nottage.
6 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 18 March 2015
I read this book as a child and it is. therefore, some time ago. With the advent of the Kindle and cheap classics I decided to reread some childhood favourites. I was absolutely delighted to discover that this book was still fresh and entertaining. So many of the nineteenth century children's classics ("Little Woman" and "What Katy Did" come to mind) are moralising to such a degree that all the innocence and independence are driven out of their female characters but that is certainly not the case here.

Anne is an orphan who has been passed from one family to another as a cheap help for families with children. She has ended up now in an orphanage and is offered a chance of a new home by Mathew and Marilla, an older sister and brother couple who think that they are getting a boy to help on the farm. From the first, Anne's character is engaging. She has a great enthusiasm for life and for words and an excellent imagination. She tries to be good but events often overcome her. She is cheery and friendly although she can really hold a grudge. She is a real person, consistent within the story but growing and developing. Nothing major happens to Anne but what does is engaging and although the reader may seem to have little in common with a young woman from nineteenth century rural Canada Anne experiences much which is common to all humanity.

I smiled my way through this book and regret that it has been so long since I read it - definitely a classic.
|0Comment|Report abuse

Need customer service? Click here