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on 10 October 2013
Please note that I dont say vegetarian, but veggie recipes.... and that is one of the things I liked the most: simple&tasty approach of a true Food Creative that happens to use 'only' veggies in her new cookbook. Beautiful and appealing french style recipes, full of colours, organized by seasons, easy to make, with great flavours and a real pleasure to look at. This is the French Market Cookbook. The author wanted, despite not being vegetarian herself, to cut down her meat and dairy intake by exploring a classic french style cuisine redirected towards a more balanced nutrition. She achieved it in such a natural, playful, easy going way, without any extremism but curiosity and joy... that you can actually feel it through the whole book when reading it. She also explores other cereals than wheat for pastry doughs, which I find brilliant too. I thought I'd like it, that is why I ordered it of course, but it turned out that I enjoyed "The French Market Cookbook" so much, that it has become straight away one of my favorites cookbooks to look for actual recipes or simply for inspiration, for creating new ones myself :) I definitely recommend it for everyone who wants to keep enjoying food, vegetarian or not, in a balanced, good mood and mouth watering way!
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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 11 September 2013
We all know, if we appreciate food, that France is full of foodies, gourmets and is nothing short of an assault on the senses. Who has not found their favourite dish,cafe, market in France? Yet it is not that easy to find vegetarian food. Here is a lady who knows all about food, vegetarian a la Parisienne. An original cook and with her own successful food blog. On the opening page, Clotilde declares, if you are in doubt "I am a resolutely vegetable-oriented cook" yet that does nothing to explain the kind of cook she really is. So read on, '... nothing makes my heart flutter like the first, and the last, of any fruit and vegetable'. Now you begin to understand, this lady lives for vegetables and with them she creates veritable dishes to tantalise your taste buds. Clotilde describes her exciting book as a 'love affair between French cuisine and vegetables', drawing on the plant-based fare of the ordinary man and not the haute cuisine we are used to.

The book is organized into seasons, with seasonal vegetables taking part in inspired dishes. The meals include savoury and sweet recipes. The recipes are easy to follow, with ingredients down the left hand column. This is one cookbook where I am tempted to try just about all the recipes. As a vegetarian I love them. We are told to add more vegetables to our meals, so non-vegetarians should also find this book not only fascinating but healthy. Essentials, such as sauces, doughs and stock are given at the back of the book.

The book is filled with good photography, of the recipes and of markets and a few photos of French cafes too. I'm sure, for you too, this will become a favourite. Bon appetit!
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on 10 July 2014
For me, there's nothing nicer than to buy a cookbook written by someone who lives somewhere you don't, and who writes engagingly, peppers the book with homely anecdotes and easy to follow recipes, illustrated by stunning photographs.

I should have realised from the title that there wouldn't be many cakes included within it, but those that are are absolutely stunning and worth looking out for, particularly the Chocolate Berawecka (think a cross between a Stollen, fruit cake and chocolate fudge cake) and having tried it, oh my Goodness, it's good!!!

Recipes I have tried (and tried and tried) are:

Savoury Pumpkin & Cornmeal Quick Bread (Page 179) - handy way to hide veggies from children!
Cauliflower Gratin with Turmeric & Hazelnuts (Page 171) - utterly divine
Pear & Chestnut Cake (Page 143) - I used buckwheat flour instead of chestnut flour as that's what I had in my pantry. Still tasted fab

There are very few cake recipes compared to savoury recipes but I didn't mind that: I was fascinated to read of Clotilde's culinary 'journey' and this book gives a good flavour of that.
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on 13 September 2014
I was really looking forward to getting Clothilde Dusoulier's latest book for some interesting plant-based recipes. I'm a huge fan of the Chocolate & Zucchini recipe book but sadly have to say that, by comparison, this one was a bit of a let-down for me.

Most of the recipes are straightforward to follow and will definitely appeal to people looking for a way to cook more vegetables as the main focus of meals. (I'd stress that the 'French' part is kind of loosely based in this book. As Mme Dusolier mentions herself; classical French cooking is not majorly focused on vegetarian or vegan recipes) That's an immensely good thing to adapt and highlight, but does present a main point which is blatantly obvious by the title; this is a market cookery book. If access to very fresh local and seasonal produce is an issue then I'd suggest not buying this. Trying to do the majority of these recipes with anything less than 'fresh from the farm/allotment today' items is going to result in some disappointingly insipid meals. If you can get plenty from local suppliers or your own growing then there's also very useful tips in the recipes to save on any wastage, something that will aid thrifty resourcefulness.

Unfortunately, after browsing the book thoroughly, I found that many of the starters/main courses are all pretty much variations on things that I already cook from vegetarian books. Where it does really shine is on the desserts as there are some delicious looking French dishes, so if you're into sweet things this will be a good addition to a recipe book collection.
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on 6 July 2015
Absolutely stunning recipes from a fantastic cook. The book includes many cook's tips and is arranged in order of seasons. Some of the ingredients can be hard to come by, but the equivalent substitutions are listed and can be found.

I've made the Mushroom quiche recipe several times and its my favourite, along with the olive oil tart dough.
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on 19 May 2014
This is a very good book! The recipes are quite simple but the result is always delicious! The book is divided into four parts - according to seasons. This way it also encourages using seasonal fruits/vegetables... totally recommend!
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on 18 May 2014
Since my partner became a vegetarian we eat mostly vegetarian diet. He is an excellent cook and is quite picky with recipes. I bought him this book for his birthday and everything which he made based on it is very tasty.
I started to notice that the best food is indeed vegetarian. A good addition for food lovers!
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on 29 December 2015
Interesting recipes, but not what I had in mind when I bought the book. My fault completely. I saw "French market" and "seasonal recipes", and living in France as I do, somehow expected simple, down-to-earth recipes to make the best out of the seasonal produce one might find at the local market.

And although the book does indeed offer seasonal recipes, I clearly overlooked the "Parisian Kitchen" part of the title, which pretty much defines the approach to be found inside. I'm guessing part of my confusion had something to do with the interpretation of "French cooking", which is not the same if you've been living in France for some time and have come to accept the cooking as normal/homely (not all French cuisine is refined and elegant; look up their Hachis parmentiers [Shepherd's pies] or hearty, winter stews and you'll see what I mean) or you're living in the U.S./UK, looking for fancy French recipes to add a touch of sophistication to your cuisine.

After having received the book and taken a good look (and eventually, looked up the author), I realised my mistake. The book isn't bad if you're looking for vegetarian dishes to impress guests with (I've decided to keep the book for just that purpose), but not what I had in mind when I bought it (my bad, once again). The recipes are generally fairly elaborate and time consuming. Many of them look delicious, but more on the fancy, bourgeois side - not particularly the kind of thing I'd usually prepare. Don't get me wrong, I'm a seasoned cook and adore cooking (a glass of red wine, soothing music, and savour the process kind of cook), but am more partial to simple, home-made recipes without the visual pizazz, long names and small portions on over-sized plates, and the recipe herein aren't really the kind one might prepare on a daily/regular basis (simple but creative ways to mix and prepare seasonal veggies).

What you're paying for here is the trendy Parisian element. It's a small-ish format, cute-looking book. There are roughly 14-15 recipes per season, plus about 5-6 seasonal deserts added in. By my count, that's about one recipe for every 6 days, or in other words, enough for one dinner party a week ;) (which feels pretty much like the book's target)

If that's what you're after, you should be fairly pleased. In my case, I think I'm going to be leaning more towards Mediterranean cooking (Spanish, Italian, Greek), which is more in line with my idea of a simple, healthy, tasty, day-to-day vegetarian cuisine.
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on 9 December 2014
I have to agree with one of the reviews below saying that it is a bit useless if you can't get your hands on fresh produce directly from a farmer. You might not be interested in this book if, like me, you live in the city and are not particularly bothered about desserts. Being French myself, I was excited to receive this book, however, it is more of a collection of finger food, side dishes and dessert recipes, which seems like a huge effort for a small result.
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on 29 September 2013
This is a really good book : clearly written and inspiring. I have bought a copy for my sister too
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