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on 20 March 2017
I brought this for me. As a Christian now I wanted to re-read that with a Christian perspective. It is a great story, but not only that C.S. Lewis has made it great story for children to understand God. Also known here as Asland. As in saying this it is perfect for everyone. Not just Christians. Enjoy reading it people.
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on 27 May 2017
Every book is as good as the one before.....
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on 9 April 2017
I found this book very good. I have read it a great many times and have enjoyed reading it every time. People of all ages should read it.
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on 14 August 2014
Was a gift, thoroughly enjoyed by receiver.
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on 17 March 2017
Fantastic stuff
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on 27 April 2017
Revelation portayed in CS Lewis style
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on 5 April 2013
I bought it to read myself & to give to my youngest grandson.. CS lewis never fails. good that the main characters are always youngsters
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on 27 April 2017
This amazing story is about Lucy and Edmund Pevinsie going to stay with their aunt Alberta Scrubb and her son Eustace Clarence Scrubb. The picture in the bedroom came to life and they went through it into Narnia. This is unusual because things like that don’t happen in real life. In Narnia, they met king Caspian and Reepicheep upon the Dawn Treader. Caspian goes in search of his father’s seven friends who were sent away. Reepicheep is off to find Aslan’s kingdom at the end of the world. It took a few months at least to get to the world’s end. It has a dramatic start going through the picture.
The main character is Eustace. At the start, he was an antagonist wanting to give Lucy and Edmund a tough time. In Narnia, he made enemies with Reepicheep and swung him by the tail. He howled and cried when he was on board the Dawn Treader. After they stopped at an island, Eustace ran off and found some treasure. Overnight he turned into a … dragon. He went back and found the crew and they thought that he was Lord Octesian because he put on a golden bracelet which belonged to Lord Octesian. Lucy asked him if he was Lord Octesian but as he wasn’t he shook his head. Lucy then asked if it was Eustace and he nodded. Lucy gave him some of the cordial which reduced the swelling but didn’t dissolve the gold. One night, Edmund awoke and saw someone – it was Eustace the boy. Eustace told him what had happened – how he met Aslan and tried to take off the dragon skin. He couldn’t do it so Aslan dug his claws in and ripped the dragon skin off. It hurt but it was all for the better. That changed Eustace completely.
This story is written in the third person e.g. he/she. It was a fantastic story because when I read it, a lot of the time I had to go to the dictionary to find out what some of the words meant. CS Lewis described the setting in detail because I could picture it in my head.
I would recommend this story because it is so fantastic because at the end when they met the lamb and had a breakfast of fish with it, it reminded me of the bible when the disciples had fish for breakfast with Jesus, the Lamb. The lamb then turned into Aslan who said that they could enter his kingdom from their world where he would be known as another name – Jesus Christ. He is the Lion and the Lamb.
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The second volume of the Narnia Chronicles closed with the possibility of Lucy and Edmund -- though not their older siblings -- returning to Narnia. "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" makes good on that story, with the intrepid pair (plus a whiny cousin) returning on a strange sea voyage.

After the events of "Prince Caspian," Lucy and Edmund are sent off to stay with their obnoxious cousin Eustace. But when they admire a picture of a strange ship, suddenly all three kids are sucked in -- and land in a Narnian sea. On board the ship is King Caspian, now fully grown, who is determined to find a bunch of knights exiled by his murderous uncle, even if he has to go to the edge of the world (literally).

Lucy and Edmund are thrilled to be back in Narnia again, but Eustance proceeds to make trouble any way he can, complaining and causing trouble among the crew. But there are problems more horrifying than any of them can guess, from dragons to sinister "gold water" to a region filled with their worst nightmares.

"The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is one of Lewis's most original and tightly-written Narnian adventures. It's also a bit of a break from form. After two books of battles against evil tyrants, "Voyage" simply goes where no man/woman/mouse has gone before, and gives us a view of the Narnian world as more than one isolated little region.

And in some ways, it's also the darkest Chronicle. Lewis explores the theme of greed here -- greed for power, beauty, money and magic -- and has some scenes both chilling and majestic. But his archly humorous style peeks through in several places, whether it's pompous mouse Reepicheep or tea with a reclusive old wizard.

Edmund and Lucy are their usual plucky selves, albeit a bit more mature than before. But "Voyage" also introduces one of Lewis' most interesting characters in Eustace Clarence Scrubb. Like Edmund, Eustace is initially a peevish, lying boy who generally makes trouble, but slowly learns his errors. But unlike Edmund, Eustace doesn't have to ally himself to the baddie to learn that.

"Voyage of the Dawn Treader" was a turning point for the Narnia Chronicles, as well as the one that began venturing into darker territory. Engaging and tightly written.
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The second volume of the Narnia Chronicles closed with the possibility of Lucy and Edmund -- though not their older siblings -- returning to Narnia. "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" makes good on that story, with the intrepid pair (plus a whiny cousin) returning on a strange sea voyage.
After the events of "Prince Caspian," Lucy and Edmund are sent off to stay with their obnoxious cousin Eustace. But when they admire a picture of a strange ship, suddenly all three kids are sucked in -- and land in a Narnian sea. On board the ship is King Caspian, now fully grown, who is determined to find a bunch of knights exiled by his murderous uncle, even if he has to go to the edge of the world (literally).
Lucy and Edmund are thrilled to be back in Narnia again, but Eustance proceeds to make trouble any way he can, complaining and causing trouble among the crew. But there are problems more horrifying than any of them can guess, from dragons to sinister "gold water" to a region filled with their worst nightmares.
"The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is one of Lewis's most original and tightly-written Narnian adventures. It's also a bit of a break from form. After two books of battles against evil tyrants, "Voyage" simply goes where no man/woman/mouse has gone before, and gives us a view of the Narnian world as more than one isolated little region.
And in some ways, it's also the darkest Chronicle. Lewis explores the theme of greed here -- greed for power, beauty, money and magic -- and has some scenes both chilling and majestic. But his archly humorous style peeks through in several places, whether it's pompous mouse Reepicheep or tea with a reclusive old wizard.
Edmund and Lucy are their usual plucky selves, albeit a bit more mature than before. But "Voyage" also introduces one of Lewis' most interesting characters in Eustace Clarence Scrubb. Like Edmund, Eustace is initially a peevish, lying boy who generally makes trouble, but slowly learns his errors. But unlike Edmund, Eustace doesn't have to ally himself to the baddie to learn that.
"Voyage of the Dawn Treader" was a turning point for the Narnia Chronicles, as well as the one that began venturing into darker territory. Engaging and tightly written.
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