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on 15 September 2017
enough that a memoir of her struggle to get there would be of interest to me. When I think that Helen Keller was also deaf and blind, her determination becomes all the more incredible. I cannot remember a time when I didn't know of Keller's existence and I am sure my mother gave me a child's edition of her story (a Ladybird book?) as soon as I was old enough to read it! However I hadn't given this example of perseverance much thought since until I needed a 1900s-published book to complete the above Decade Challenge and decided to revisit Keller's story.

I like that this memoir is written in a straightforward style without the reliance on overly emotional scenes or appeals to readers for pity. Even in her early twenties, as she was writing this memoir, Keller is already well-read and erudite beyond her years. At one point she notes blind poet Homer's immortality through his writing and I thought that the same is now true of her. Helen Keller is a name I think many people would recognise. She frequently makes sure to give credit where it is due so I understood that her success was equally as a much a result of her family's support and Anne Sullivan's tireless dedication as it was to Helen own efforts. It was also interesting to see the facilities available to deaf and/or blind American children at this period - at least to those whose parents could afford it - and to see how those resources dwindled as Helen strode past the needs of a child's education, pioneering the right of disabled people to expect college educations and independent lives. An inspirational woman.
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on 29 August 2017
I found this fascinating to read. She was an amazing woman - she lost both her sight and her hearing as a small toddler. She describes how she learned to communicate despite living in a dark and silent world.
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on 19 June 2017
I would recommend this book to anyone. In a world where selfishness abounds, it is encouraging to know there are still good people.
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on 14 September 2017
I read this as a child and wanted to refresh my memories it didn't disappoint
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on 27 April 2017
A truely inspirational life story for all who want to see life through fresh and new eyes
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on 12 March 2017
Such an amazing and inspirational woman, couldn't put it down, I just found it so interesting.
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on 13 April 2015
Beautifully written. I was drawn into Helen Keller`s world.
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on 5 August 2005
This book is Helen Keller's autobiography and is somewhat unusual because Helen Keller was deafblind. It is beautifully written and although I don't necessary agree with all the conclusions drawn by the author of the introduction, I found the autobiography very moving to read. Much of the time Helen wrote in a way that you would not realise she could neither see nor hear anything around her.
The fact that Miss Keller was not deaf from birth but became deafblind as a very small child following an illness makes her achievements particularly incredible. She had to re-learn her communication skills and this is due in no small part to her teacher and mentor, Annie Sullivan. Miss Keller came from a wealthy family who were prepared to go to endless lengths to help their daughter to live a fulfilling life, and it is thanks to them and to Miss Sullivan that we have Miss Keller's writings and pioneering work for deaf and deafblind people.
This is an incredible book to read and it also provides some interesting cameos of some of the people Miss Keller met (such as Mark Twain) because her letters are included at the end.
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on 25 March 2012
A fascinating 75-page autobiography by an extremely disabled, yet highly gifted, sensitive, likeable, very literate deaf-blind young woman of 23, she tells how she has managed to make the progress she has. (Later in her life she campaigned for the rights of disabled people and went round the world lecturing about the blind and deaf.) This is an inspiring read, both for the disabled and able-bodied.
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on 9 January 2013
I found the book intersting but not really a style of writing I found particulary easy to get into. The letter form the book took as you progressed through it was a sign of the times in which the book was written. However that doesn't take away from the fact she was an incredible person.
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