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Customer reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
9


on 11 September 2013
The Coral came into being in 1996 amid the frenzied "Brit pop "explosion" hiding in the shadows of Liverpool and the Wirral they are one of those bands who remain invisible but always in sight.

You can't name many of their songs but when you hear them you know them. They have been used extensively by the BBC soundtrack department and have also supported Liverpool stalwarts Echo and the Bunnymen on a number of occasions
So after more than a decade drumming for the Coral and delivering a fist full of top ten albums including a number 1, Ian Skelly has recorded his solo debut, in which he filters guitars, flutes, mellotrons and sharp pop/folk songwriting through a psychedelic haze.

Much of Cut from a Star sounds as if it could have been blasted straight from the late 60s. It has a very Woodstock lucid dreamscape feel to it inspired no doubt by a "Skunk" if you know what I mean.

The sound is not too far removed for the "Butterfy House" it has a mysterious, slightly foreboding atmosphere about it whilst the ghosts of Syd Barrett and Nick Drake shimmy by casting shadowy reflections over pretty pop melodies. This is the kind of album that you listen to in the dark in the moments before sleep each song grabs the listener and sucks them in to another dimension slowly and willingly.
Each song is finely crafted and although you won't be singing along it will leave you thirsty for more the songs that just seem to resonant with deep passion as Skelly drags you in to his Alice in Wonderland subconscious in which invites the listener to get lost in.

This young man is very talented and steering his ship away from the mainstream ports is a good thing but sad because he will go unnoticed by the vast majority.
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on 24 March 2016
Annoyed with myself that this album by-passed me & I stumbled upon it while browsing! I didn't even know that Ian Skelly had brought out a solo album & with me being a Coral fan I was wondering how I'd missed it. Anyway, I think 3* is good enough for this album, I've listened to it 3 times now & I've enjoyed more with each listen and it is a very good album. Each track seems just to slip in to each other, the one that catches my ear most is I CALL HER NAME. I can see me liking this album with each listen,so much so, it really put me in the mood for FOREVER CHANGES by LOVE. Not a bad live acoustic session on here either!
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on 31 July 2015
All Good. Many thanks!
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on 9 September 2013
As a long-time Coral fan I was really looking forward to this album and I must say I'm a little disappointed , not so much because of the songs , because they are great, but because of the poor way they have been recorded and mastered (if at all).There is so much going on but there is no space around the instruments , everything sounds muffled so that the songs aren't allowed to "breathe" - which doesn't make it a pleasure to listen to this album .
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on 11 October 2016
Man i cant get enough of this album i have had to stop playing my vinyl copy in fear ill scratch it ! The vinyl is rarer then hens teeth now ! I even have the first edition cd , but this has a bonus live acoustic session which is amazin! My biggest down fall is i never got to him perfom live ! Also check out his other outfit serpent power self titled LP
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on 13 March 2013
This is a top quality debut solo album from Ian Skelly that captures the dreamy rich sound of 60's psychedelia. Hints of this were on the Coral's excellent Butterfly House, bonus cd. There is a real depth to the music with stunning vocals. The songs just seem to flow from start to finish and add up to a very enjoyable listening experience.
With brother James about to release his eagerly awaited solo release and hopefully another Coral album not too far off, these are good times for fans of this very underrated band.
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on 10 December 2012
Skelly is the drummer with The Coral, one of the more underrated bands of the early-Noughties indie rock boom.

The apple hasn't fallen from the tree, and CFAS is an album of pleasingly downbeat English psych. There are hints of Arthur Lee and Nick Drake and even, on the courtly "Nickel and a Dime", medieval folk. It's unlikely to make Skelly or his parent band less overlooked, but will charm many who stumble upon it.

A truely stunning record - hope The Coral have a new one out soon
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on 13 January 2013
Great songs, amazing art work, a psychedelic masterpiece! I haven't stopped listening to it since it arrived an ever time i hear something new.
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on 12 December 2012
first class, up there with the best of the coral, well produced, well structured and a real flow throught the album. won't disappoint
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