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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
23
4.7 out of 5 stars
How to Study for a Mathematics Degree
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£11.99


on 19 October 2017
Good book and quality is fine.
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on 19 July 2017
A thought provoking book for those going to study maths at university
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Learned something new!
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on 17 September 2017
Perfect book for anyone about to start a mathematics related degree.
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I bought this book, with a view to studying for a maths degree via the Open University - I already have a BSc, MSc and PhD in engineering. I thought a maths degree would benefit me, as I have problems understanding some of the maths in scientific papers I need to read for my job. I actually contacted the author, to ask her some questions about the suitability of a maths degree for my needs - I sent here some research papers I could not understand, as the mathematics was too complicated for me. She confirmed a maths degree would be a lot of pure maths, and not so much the applied maths I needed. Although she admitted to not being an expert, she felt physics might have been better.

(I eventually gave up the idea of studying with the OU, as they expect me to do the most basic of classes, despite I have a BSc, MSc and PhD. The fact I got the PhD. more than 16 years ago, means it counts as absolutely nothing for the Open University.)

Having 3 degrees, I have a pretty good idea of what university life is like, and can see this book would be very helpful to those starting at uni, having left school. There's a lot of emphasis in the student taking responsibility for their work, as you will not have your hand held like in school.

The author clearly has a lot of experience at several academic institutions, so her experience is not based on working at one place all the time. Although she was educated at the University of Warwick in the UK, she has taught at the Rutgers University in the USA, as well as both Essex and Loughborough in the UK. As such, I believe she has a good understanding of what mathematics education is like. It is her specialist area of research too.

One particularly interesting thing she says, is that mathematics students should not expect to see lots of examples from their lecturers, but may get few if any examples provided. Students need to be able to generate their own examples. This was not my experience from my engineering degrees, but I have every reason to believe she is right about how maths degrees are taught, due to the fact she has been educated and taught at 4 different places. Had her experience been limited to one university, I would have paid less attention to this.

Although not a mathematics text book, the book is quite thought provoking - for example, why is (-2)^2 = +4. We all know a negative number multiplied by a negative number is positive, but it is far from obvious WHY that is so. Could you prove it?

There's a lot of information about how not to get yourself in a position where you are behind, but also how to get out if it if you are.

Overall, and excellent book, and I would certainly suggest any maths student buys this, even if like myself, they have other degrees.

Dr. David Kirkby, BSc, MSc, Ph.D
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on 27 December 2016
An outstanding book for any undergraduate or A level student. The book is full of detail and tips to help you succeed if your studying for Mathematics Degree. My advice would be to get this book as early as possible (ideally near the end of your A level Mathematics course or the summer before you start University as it will give some preparation to University.

The book won't make you fly through your Mathematics Degree but it will certainly make your experience a little easier!

The Arthur goes into some great detail on what to expect from lectures, what the tutors expect off you and how best to approach your course and fellow students.
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on 12 June 2016
Was very useful during the time before I began my degree, this book set me up perfectly to study for my degree. It has concepts and problems that will be easily understandable by the highschool graduate target audience, and helps build up a basis for degree-level work.
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on 2 April 2013
This is a book that every potential undergraduate student of mathematics should purchase. It has a very thorough description of what is involved with being an undergraduate in mathematics at university.
Alcock has succeeded in writing a relevant, interesting and beneficial account of what it is like to be a maths undergraduate. She highlights the differences between pure and applicable mathematics and what skills are needed to flourish in these. However the emphasis is on pure mathematics throughout the book.
Additionally the author does not shy away from doing some serious mathematics even though the book is written for the layman. The technical mathematics is described in simple terms that all sixth formers will understand.
The book is very well organised and has good quality writing style - well expressed, clarity, coherence etc. It is split into two - mathematics and study skills.
My only reservation is the lack of illustrations. Including these would have more of an impact but it is not a serious omission.
I would recommend this book to any student or teacher of mathematics.
Kuldeep Singh
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on 11 January 2017
Excellent product, thank you.
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on 3 September 2016
Useful and relatable for a first year. Recommended to me by my mechanics lecturer - and the ideas remain relevant today (I am in third year now).
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