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4.2 out of 5 stars
37
4.2 out of 5 stars
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on 11 October 2012
A good book can be so for all sorts of reasons; a happy ending, characters getting their just desserts, but I find that a memorable or successful book is often considered so because of the difficult or troubling scenes such as the ones that occur in Foreman's Warsaw. These are the scenes that affect the reader so much so that they have the power to make you want to close the book or turn the page - and (despite some apprehension) I was glad to have turned the page. I enjoyed reading the background to the main characters, which drew me further into the story and helped line up the tragic events that unfold. The author does a good job of exposing the bleakness of life and the good and bad extremes of humanity as well as including a realistic portrait of the ghetto and Treblinka.
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on 19 October 2012
What a wonderful story, which seemed to transport me to the Warsaw Ghetto. The story follows Jessica , Adam and Thomas who all try to survive the Ghetto even though they stand on different sides. While Jessica and Adam have to deal with fear of death everyday, Thomas is coping with trying to retain his self and humanity. In this setting Foreman works a surprising and touching love story. Between Warsaw and Treblinka there is still love and friendship is possible. Besides the story there's plenty of historical information about the Ghetto, which complimented the fiction. This haunting and beautiful story leaves you cold with images of what life would have been like, together with the feeling of strength of the jewish prisoners and those who managed to survive under such brutal oppression. A special book in many ways.
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on 25 March 2013
Set in 1942, Warsaw explores life - and death - in the ghetto. Jewish policeman Adam Duritz battles depression and his survival instinct is often at war with the guilt he harbours due to the requirements of his position. The novel psychologically examines Duritz' fractured sense of self, losing his "strength" as he is compelled to sentence 5 Jews a day to death in order to protect his own life. Foreman explores the dehumanisation of humanity: "officers perhaps did not notice the blood on their hands through the ink stains from continuously writing down figures in appropriate boxes".

Foreman's characterisation often subverts more traditional archetypes of World War Two. The German soldier Thomas Abendroth represents a force of goodness in the text. Adam Duritz is a troubled character; abusing his position as a Jewish police-man he still eventually invites the reader's sympathy, admiration and curiousity in his struggle with life in the Warsaw ghetto.

Warsaw is an intelligent and sensitively written novel, yet the ending also reads like a thriller and, despite the authors research and dedication to capturing a sense of history, the book is ultimately a tragic love story.
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on 7 July 2014
A superb - but tragic - novel. The action takes place over six months and concerns the lives of a Jewish policeman and German soldier in the Warsaw Ghetto. The author does not pull his punches and the full misery of the Ghetto and Treblinka are put before the reader. In places the writing could be a bit tighter but overall Warsaw is a brilliant book which blends together history, philosophy and a memorable love story. Had lump in my throat by the end.
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on 26 April 2017
Excellent read with with different take on wartime Warsaw. Very moving in parts. Sometimes takes a moment to catch multiple character changes within chapters, but once you get used to it it does not spoil a good book.
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on 10 May 2013
Whilst this book is a novel I have no doubt that the content is close to reality. I have read Holocaust by Martin Gilbert and his writings would suggest that Richard Foremans work is very likely more fact than fiction. Very very well written
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on 12 May 2017
A very good read.
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on 9 April 2017
a book
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on 3 March 2016
This is an excellent book. The horrors of the ghetto are portrayed through convincing characters with ultimately there being the hope of survival in a better world.
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on 7 July 2014
Warsaw is completely different from author's Roman fiction but I'm glad I stuck with it. Although there are occasional flashes of black humour and action the novel is far more emotional and intelligent that Foreman's Sword of Rome books. I'd be tempted to recommend it to my book club, although I fear book would sadden them too much! If you enjoyed Schindler's List or The Pianist then would recommend Warsaw to you also. The book doesn't quite sustain it's quality all the way through but when it's good it's often great. The novel has one of the best endings too I've read for a while.
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