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Customer Reviews

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on 28 March 2014
I bought this after hearing one of their tracks on BBC 6Music, and the whole album did not dissapoint. It is perfect dinner party music, people will always ask who it is.
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on 31 October 2012
Menahan's 'Make The Road By Walking' was a fantastically beat-driven, horn-tastic, catchy affair.

This second album is a different beast altogether. Although still toe-tappingly good, it has a very different vibe. At times it's very Budos-esque, surprisingly so. Rich in horn saturated orchestration and deeply atmospheric... even eerie at times.

It'd make a great score to a movie.

Overall, this is a far more laid back affair. That being said, the horns are still here, the beats are still groovy, and the music is still fantastic.
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on 3 January 2013
With a debut album of instrumental funk that contained plenty of refreshing summer grooves, Tommy Breneck & co. have followed with an altogether more wintery record of blues and thought provoking melancholy.

I've got to be honest, pretty much everything about this record is likeable , but it's actually the imperfectness of the record that creates it's beauty.

For instance, there's a sort of wearyness to the sound of most of the bands instruments, the kind of sound a horn would make when it's been on the road alot is apparent here and for that reason it's a little dog eared in places but full of charm. Opening with the title track, MSB make the most of intricate harp play as it's tempered by a Knightrider-esque bassline and equally as cool, without the kitsch.

Lights Out sounds like a Bill Conti soundtrack, an uplifting call to battle that Rocky would have been pleased to train to. Later on in the album we're taken to another soundtrack scenario on Seven in The Wind. Ennio Morricone could have written this record and with it's slide guitar reverb and slow horn play, it's completely engrossing.

And if this album veers away into melancholy and recession blues, then the only exception is the sunny 'Everyday a Dream' which could have easily fitted onto the bands first album Make The Road By Walking. Top stuff, i would highly recommend!
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on 20 May 2014
Simply incredible album! There are so few albums I can listen to from a-z and what these guys do as an instrumental band is phenomenal!!!
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on 28 January 2015
Good
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