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on 5 January 2013
the thinking in this book is absolutely stunning. It's accessible, well structured and crafted to engage and inform poetically - It is a joy to read
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on 8 November 2016
It is Macy
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on 19 July 2011
Clearly written with exceptional sense of purposefulness and personal responsibility towards sharing a narrative of hope and action in a world of uncertainty and immediate dangers. The book calls one to action and self exploration and gives real examples through personal experiences, unique insights of the author and historic figures. This book is one that will be reread many times in my lifetime and one that has already compelled me gently to change the pattern of my days. Interdependency and connectiveness permeate every page as does our unique giftedness to chose, act share and change our world....all of it!!
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on 6 December 1997
Reading Brazilian theologian Leonardo Boff's Cry of the Earth, Cry of the Poor this fall, I was reminded of Buddhist scholar Joanna Macy's World as Lover, World as Self, a book I first read at the beginning of this decade and have reread several times since. The environmental problems we're witnessing today will require as much spiritual transformation as economic change. And it's not a question of "getting religion" as much experiencing the spirituality of place. I've had as many negative encounters with fundamentalists as I have had with newagers. The first believe that life gets better after you're dead, the second group believe that life is but a dream. Is there an alternative? Macy writes about the Buddhist practice of "Sarvodaya" - which means "everybody wakes up." She writes: "In my mind I still hear the local Sarvodaya workers, in their village meetings and district training centers. Development is not imitating the West. Development is not high-cost industrial complexes, chemical fertilizers and mammoth hydro-electric dams. It is not selling your soul for unnecessary consumer items or schemes to get rich quick. Development is waking up - waking up our true potential as persons and as a society." (p. 132)
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