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An original Doctor Who novel. It tells an all new story for the Eleventh Doctor, Amy and Rory, which hasn't appeared before in any other medium.

The book runs for two hundred and thirty eight pages. It's divided into fifteen chapters, plus a prologue and an epilogue.

As with the rest of this range, it's suitable for all ages, and captures the lead characters perfectly, with dialogue that you can imagine the actors saying.

The story takes place in London. At two very different times. In 1910, when strange monsters are lurking in the city. And the only person who stands against them is retired secret agent Professor Archibald Angelchrist. And in 2789. When strange experiments have had deadly consequences.

As a result of which, London of then is under threat. If the monsters can't be stopped, the human race is doomed...

Although the plot isn't anything entirely out of the ordinary, It does hold the attention thanks to some decent writing. And shifting back and forth through the two time periods. What also helps is that the action is seen almost entirely through the eyes of Rory in some chapters, and Professor Angelchrist in the others.

The former is written so very well in character as to make it possibly the best of all his appearances in this range. It allows him to work through his feelings for the way he lives and the people he does it with very nicely. And the latter is a truly marvellous and very original creation. Very much written as a man of his time and of science as well.

All of this makes the book click, because it really makes you care for it's characters.

There are time travel elements of the plot that are clever without being too confusing, and an epilogue that will stick in the mind for a while. For the right reasons. All that makes it a very above average entry in this range.
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on 6 November 2014
Excellent story this one..A cryptic message from an A.I sends The Doctor,Amy and Rory into this adventure..The Doctor ends up in the past with an exentric Professor called Angelchrist..who has had dealings with aliens before and Amy and Rory end up in the far future trying to find Professor Gratius the inventer of the A.I. They all encounter The Squall..creatures that feed on psychic energy and kill thier victims..This brilliant novels flows so well through out..The Doctor is as amazing and mad as ever..Amy and Rory meet the A.I and name him Arven..and they are on the run from The Squall..You feel their fear,determination and bravery as they fight for survival waiting for The Doctor to save them..The Doctor and Angelchrist make a brilliant team..I liked that in part you saw things through the eyes and thoughts of Angelchrist..Arven you felt for also trying to defend them from The Squall...All the players gel together so very well...The ending is kind of touching also...I think all Doctor Who fans will really enjoy this..I know I did.
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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 15 September 2014
This novel features the Eleventh Doctor, with Amy and Rory. The Tardis materialises in London in 2789, where an incongruously ancient AI unit has been pulled from the river, and seems to have a message for the Doctor. Can this be related to mysterious deaths that are occurring in London in 1910? And just what can the Doctor do about it?

The story alternates its chapters between 2789, with the Doctor and Professor Angelchrist; and 1910, with Amy and Rory; all trying to find the beginning and ends to a time paradox which may be more costly than any of them could ever have imagined.

This story is a good Doctor Who novel; the writing is fast-paced, and the characters seem true to form, although I have not watched much of the Eleventh Doctor era, being more of a `classic' Doctor Who fan. There is perhaps a bit much of the "Resistance is futile" to-ing and fro-ing, and there never really seems to be a true sense of danger, but you get there in the end. Harmless entertainment.
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on 4 July 2012
There are some great Doctor Who novels, and there are some pretty rubbish ones. Unfortunately, for me, this falls into the latter category. Although it has the potential for a very interesting plot, it just fails to deliver for me. Unless you've got nothing else to read whatsoever, I would recommend leaving this and instead buying a great Doctor Who novel, like Doctor Who: Touched by an Angel or maybe Doctor Who: Dead of Winter.
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on 17 February 2016
Following a strange signal received by the Tardis Amy, Rory and the Doctor arrive in twenty-eighth century London to witness a body being dragged from the Thames. This is no ordinary body, however, and has been there far longer than it possibly could be. It is a mystery the Doctor must solve before a paradox evolves and the Squall consume everything in their path.

Apart from the play on the title (which, perhaps, promises slightly more than the book delivers) the novel doesn’t really seem to have anything to do with John Milton’s epic ‘Paradise Lost’. However, the Squall do possess a somewhat demonic, impish appearance.

The story is set in one physical location but in two time periods. Thus it features both an historical London in 1910 and a futuristic version of the city. Intriguingly it is the similarities between the two which are more poignant than the differences. It allows for a good way to divide the Tardis crew and provides the novel with a firm structure during the first half that sees chapters alternate between the two time periods. It is a shame that this element is lost as the main characters come together for the latter stages as it works fairly well in having what happens in one time period effect the other.

With Amy and Rory left to investigate in the future the Doctor adopts a temporary companion of his own in 1910 in the form of Professor Angelchrist (so named I assume to vaguely reference ‘Paradise Lost’). The Professor is quite an endearing character who once worked for a branch of the British secret service investigating alien findings and incursions. It sounds a bit like an older period of Torchwood but there is connection made here if it is. Angelchrist has become jaded with life but his meeting the Doctor revitalises him and provides some touching sequences in the novel.

Not to be left out, Amy and Rory also seem to pick up their own de facto companion in the form of android Arven.

The story is more about the five lead characters than their foes. The Squall are essentially used as ravenous monsters that relentlessly pursue the Tardis team and their colleagues through areas of London both in the past and the future. They are more of an unstoppable force than an alien species that can be interacted with in any way. Although as pan-dimensional creatures possessing some form of hive mind they are a reasonably interesting and original creation.
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VINE VOICEon 29 August 2011
Paradox Lost is another one of those timey wimey narratives that have proliferated in Doctor Who novels of late. Having landed in the late 28th Century, the Doctor and his companions are confronted by the mangled body of an android, which has been in the Thames for a thousand years. The android warns the Doctor that he must stop Professor Gradius' time experiments, or else a malevolent alien race called the Squall will consume the world. So, the Doctor decides that he must travel back to the early 20th Century to confront the Squall, while entrusting Amy and Rory to stop Gradius' time experiments.

Although the Doctor receives help from a Professor `Angelchrist', I don't think that the plot of Paradox Lost has otherwise much to do with John Milton's epic poem, Paradise Lost, from which George Mann has evidently derived his title. I suppose the demonic Squall could be regarded as being akin to rebel angels. However, since the Doctor is their main adversary, if George Mann was attempting a pastiche of Paradise Lost, then this would mean that the Doctor is a kind of messianic figure in this narrative. Indeed, it's no doubt a truism that the Doctor is a kind of stand-in messiah in our secular age, a distinction that he shares with many other fantastic heroes (although I'd argue that the Doctor is by far the best role model). So although there is a bit of sacred imagery and metaphor employed here, Paradox Lost is by no means a religious narrative, despite the resurrection of one of the characters at the end.

George Mann, appropriately enough, is well versed in Doctor Who. For instance, there is the suggestion, at the end, that the Doctor has gone off on a short jaunt to Totter's Lane to dump off some rubbish, which is a nice subtle reference to the very beginning of the Doctor's televised adventures. In addition to this, there is a gentle hint to the devastation that will be caused by solar flares in the 29th Century, which has featured in several of the Doctor's adventures. George Mann also does a nice line in speculation, as his theory as to why the TARDIS console is made up of bric-a-brac is due to the Doctor having to replace worn out parts with whatever junk he has to hand. Professor Angelchrist would appear to be an early prototype of the Doctor with regards to his UNIT role, albeit he is very much human. The Doctor soon appropriates his motor car however, in another reference to the Pertwee era, since this vehicle is quite akin to that incarnation's favourite roadster, Bessie.

Paradox Lost starts off at a nice even pace, before the middle section really ramps up the action to a pleasing scale. However, I thought that the resolution was a bit uneven in places. The Squall are hell-bent on consuming the Doctor's mind, much like at least one other alien entity in recent Doctor Who novels, so there is a bit of repetition from this point of view which the editor of the book could perhaps have pointed out, although this element is quite integral to the resolution of the plot. George Mann's representation of the Doctor and his companions is mostly excellent and spot on. I very much liked the fact that this wasn't a Star Trek style of temporal paradox narrative, as the great majority of the `people' who die in the book do indeed stay dead (with one sentimental exception). Indeed, it was good to read Rory's anguish at the devastation that he and Amy unwittingly wrought in the book. The paradox itself is of sufficient timey wimieness to satisfy even the most ardent Doctor Who fan.
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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 4 February 2012
This novel features the Eleventh Doctor, with Amy and Rory. The Tardis materialises in London in 2789, where an incongruously ancient AI unit has been pulled from the river, and seems to have a message for the Doctor. Can this be related to mysterious deaths that are occurring in London in 1910? And just what can the Doctor do about it?

The story alternates its chapters between 2789, with the Doctor and Professor Angelchrist; and 1910, with Amy and Rory; all trying to find the beginning and ends to a time paradox which may be more costly than any of them could ever have imagined.

This story is a good Doctor Who novel; the writing is fast-paced, and the characters seem true to form, although I have not watched much of the Eleventh Doctor era, being more of a `classic' Doctor Who fan. There is perhaps a bit much of the "Resistance is futile" to-ing and fro-ing, and there never really seems to be a true sense of danger, but you get there in the end. Harmless entertainment.
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on 25 January 2013
As a massive doctor who fan. I was not disappointed by this book it's the first one I have read by this author and was great we'll written and very good read easy going and fun, full of adventure and heroics, just what you want from the who. I loved it.
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on 16 May 2014
I've been reading the Eleventh Doctor novels recently and some - most - have been 'so so', 'disposable', not something I'd ever pick up and read again. One I couldn't even finish, I thought it was so weak. But THIS - oh, this is the first I've come across that made me think 'Classic'. This I will keep and look forward to re-reading. I will also be trying some of Mann's other books. And I'd love to see more Who by this author. Or, if not, then more Professor Angelchrist books, please.
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on 14 April 2013
'The Squall feed on psychic energy. They spread like a plague and if they are not stopped they will strip the Earth clean...'

London 1910: an unsuspecting thief finds himself confronted by grey-skinned creatures that are waiting to devour his mind. London 2789: the remains of an ancient android are dredged from the Thames. When reactivated it has a warning that can only be delivered to a man named 'the Doctor'.

The Doctor and his friends must solve a mystery that has spanned over a thousand years. If they fail, the deadly alien Squall will devour the world.

A thrilling all-new adventure featuring the Doctor, Amy and Rory, as played by Matt Smith, Karen Gillan and Arthur Darvill in the spectacular hit Doctor Who series from BBC Television.
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