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on 29 November 2012
Yes, the book was written in a different age. The baddie is actually a person in the Sherlock Holmes/Moriarty mould. Yes, the protagonists could have done away with each other in the first book. Indeed given his exploits it was surprising that Drummond even survived the war. Drummond occupies the moral high ground although he works on the wrong side of the law. Like Holmes and Templar, Drummond has a working relationship with officers from Scotland Yard who are frequently left to clear up after him.

Unlike many modern novels, the lower orders speak in the vernacular and some foreigners "English they like Germans speak." This lends a different flavour to the yarns.

Of interest is the pace of the novels in relation to the modern world. Long distance travel is by train not plane although small planes are used from time to time. We also have to remember that the cars used are today's vintage cars and adjust our thoughts accordingly.

Whether the books would appeal to a younger readership used to the modern genre of special forces type thrillers with easily out dateable plots is questionable. To an older readership brought up with Biggles, the Saint, and other tales of daring-do this omnibus will bring back old memories.

The 10 books that comprise this collection work out at 7.7p per book and astonishingly good value for money.
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on 25 December 2013
Dear old Bulldog Drummond takes you back to the days when men were men (especially Englishmen) and villains got a jolly good biff on the jaw to teach them a lesson. Actually, that's unfair, because the stories are far better written than that implies, and death, sometimes in unpleasant form, strikes as often as the fist on the jaw. Although the books are for obvious reasons dated, they remain amongst the very best of their type. If you like a good rousing rollicking read, then you are in for a treat.
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on 4 May 2017
A very refreshing 'Dick Barton' sort of book -and definitely not politically correct.
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on 2 September 2016
Great
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on 30 December 2012
One of the real joys of kindle. I had read the first before,but none of the others were in print. Very typical of 1930s style. If you enjoy that you will love this.
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on 20 January 2013
Already have all the Bulldog Drummond books, but this is a lovely way to carry them around. Good, clean, adventures.
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More years ago than I care to remember, I read the first book of this series and it really fired my imagination.

To be given the opportunity to read ALL the Bulldog Drummond books in succession was a wonderful way to recapture my lost youth.

To be hypercritical, there were a small number if typographical errors, but not enough to spoil my enjoyment.

One question remains, however - what happened to Phyllis?
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on 15 January 2013
intruduced to the series over 50 years ago when I was a teenager and still have some of the books. given a Kindle for last Christmas by my son.who offered to put a book of my choice on for me and the series sprang to mind--absolute nostalgia and still a very good read and the Kindle has been marvellous
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on 5 October 2012
I missed Bulldog Drummond first time round when I was a boy, but looking back to the difficult years after the first world war I can see its appeal to that generation. The aristocratic/public school/army hero with his monocular chums reminds me of the Magnet and the Gem? The plot is repetitive as they pursue the immortal(and immoral) arch-villain through one adventure after another and save the nation from catastrophe, killing endless people with impunity in the process, while an impotent and incompetent policeman follows up several paces behind. You have to wonder why the hero and the villain did not kill each other and be done with it, but then I suppose there would not have been a book. The writer is tempted to wave the anti-socialist/communist flag a little too vigorously, but again, that goes with age. The writing is verbose and the dialogue of the chums and the villain too irritatingly colourful. I can't believe anyone ever spoke as the Bulldog does and it gets a bit wearing. And anyone so obsessed with risking his own and other peoples lives in daring adventure should never have married the charming Phyllis.
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on 4 March 2016
Tremendous action adventures in the boy's own style. The stories rattle along and before you know it, your realise you've finished one, exhausted by the non-stop action - and keen to start the next one. The age of the writing shows through sometimes in that the author has never heard of equality. Bulldog is more like a springer spaniel the way he barges through the obstacles to get the prize. Great fun.
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