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3.7 out of 5 stars
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3.7 out of 5 stars
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on 7 April 2013
Any atheist who has read the bible, or ever been involved in some sort of debate, will have seen the scaffolding of the topics in this book before. Indeed, the reason this book misses out on a '5' star rating for me is that much of the content has been examined, in detail, before. The author keeps to passages that are rather obvious, and easy, to find much vileness within.

That said, the explanations and arguments are interesting to ponder, and this book is an excellent starting point for all of the passages examined within it. It certainly is no Hitchens novel, but don't dismiss it: It packs a mean right hook.
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on 3 January 2013
I am full of admiration and support for this man who has escaped the clutches of what sounds like a quite fundamentalist religious group, and become an atheist. He clearly knows his bible inside out and uses his knowledge to provide evidence for his critcisms but there is no real structure or substance to back them up. I find the style of writing irritatingly juvenile: the points are all valid but the arguments are superficial and endlessly repetitive. I get the impression that Mr Baker would come off very badly in a discussion with an articulate theologian, which worries me because I totally support his basic premise that the bible has had a much too easy ride from uncritical believers, as he once was.
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on 3 December 2012
In his Introduction, Brian Baker states that his problem with the Bible isn't that it's just a collection of stories and myths written by many authors over a millennia and a half, but rather it's how it is presented as "the word of God". In this straightforward paragraph he sums up the real issue; we can probably deal with contradictions, wildly exaggerated claims, inconsistencies and errors if we are comfortable with the Bible as a subject of cultural and sociological study and nothing more.
Baker lists the more common of these anomalies within the Bible and takes some pleasure in pointing out the text which argues for cannabilism, rape, murder and general malfeasance, all "in the name of God". In doing this, I feel he has provided the text he refers to with a layer of credibility it does not deserve. On the one hand he is saying the Bible is a random book of stories, a pick and mix "1001 nights" of which one would expect little in respect of hard fact or literal history. By then critiquing the finer text of these stories Baker is arguing as if they were such hard facts or literal history and that is clearly not his goal with this book.
He can be sensationalist in his style and does repeat his core tenet over and over, but there is an honesty in his writing that smacks of catharsis for him, and who can blame him that!
In this book, Baker touches on his personal journey and perhaps i should have come to this having read his earlier work as that sounds like the real story here. That and not What the Bible says, but Why it still says it to so many people.
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on 14 September 2012
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, partly because the author's journey through life somewhat mirrored my own which resulted in my own series, 'The Mormon Delusion', being written. This book is both logical and factual in its approach to the Bible. The evidence it presents in the cold light of day cannot be refuted. It leaves you in no doubt that belief in much of the nonsense in the Bible can only be maintained by choosing to have faith in fiction. Logic and reason as well as conclusive evidence must be completely ignored in order to believe it. Highly recommended work and well worth the read. Baker knows his stuff.
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on 1 November 2012
Some of the content of this book is interesting, and it is interesting to see the relevant excerpts of scripture, but the writing style becomes quite grating very quickly. Too many exclamation marks and repetitions.
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on 9 March 2015
Whilst it is perfectly plain that The Bible is a collection of fables and fairy stories, it doesn't do any harm to discover how others have arrived at this conclusion. Mr. Baker's writing style is clear, personal, and persuasive. Clearly speaking from conviction and reasoning, the author lays out the facts for all to see. Born again delusional will deny the truth, preferring to continue in their self-deception rather than read this book. And much good may it do them. Believing clear absurdity with devotion and reverence does not make it true. Wishing never works.
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on 29 March 2013
Another great addition to the Atheists collection of proof. This book shows us all the rubbish that ancient men put down as inspired scripture and which is followed by million of modern people who should know better. What price education?
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on 21 February 2013
This book gave me some things to think about particularly as the author has come from a totally "believe all" background. All total believers should read it to challenge their absolute faith positions.
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on 18 October 2013
I awarded this book 5* on the basis of value for money and because it lets the Bible do the talking, with extended relevant texts. I didn't like the confessional style, the hyperbole or the exclamation marks, but the sections which dealt with the Bible as an unreliable text were excellent. In particular, the chapter on the end times and the second coming explores what the Bible actually says on these topics and finds it wanting. The chapters on the Crucifiction and Resurrection and the Prophecies are also good. It was less good when it strayed into areas such as the power of prayer and family values, or into the Old Testament myths, but these chapters are well worth reading too. I have yet to encounter convincing Christian answers to the key questions: "Was Jesus the son of God or the son of a Man?" "Why are there such inconsistencies around the Resurrection story?" and "Why did Christ break his repeated promise to return within the lifetime of those listening to him?" This book will not answer those questions for you, because it sets out to show that the Bible itself presents a confusing story. People of faith will not, I'm sure, be impressed; much less convinced.
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on 14 February 2013
The author was a born-again Christian who for some years ran a very successful religious ministry,until he came to question the bases of his belief and became an atheist. Here he demonstrates some of the many contradictory, implausible or impossible accounts to be found in the Bible. It's been done before but for anyone who wants a clear and readable selection of absurdities, this is recommended. it will of course very seldom influence the devout, if any pick it up, as faith is generally proof against argument and evidence (as some reviews by religious writers show). But then again you never know.
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