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4.8 out of 5 stars
46
4.8 out of 5 stars


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on 14 March 2013
This is just a wonderful reminder of that a few nice things also emerged in the mid eighties. Say along with The Smiths and FYC', this record is a solid, beautiful proof of that. We thank you lads for the good times.
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on 1 May 2017
A good album, upbeat!
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on 3 July 2016
CRAZY !
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on 3 April 2017
Product as described and good delivery.
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on 25 May 2017
Great cd
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on 7 August 2017
Brilliant Album!!!
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on 6 December 2000
It amazes me that in all of the End of the Century polls the music press and the like have conducted this album has never been mentioned.
It is full of catchy tunes, intelligent lyrics, humour, a splash of politics, but mainly it's the sheer excellence and beauty of these finely polished 3 minute masterpieces including the magnificent "Happy Hour", the poignant "Flag Day" and the original version of my own favourite "Think For A Minute".
Paul Heaton's mastery of the lyric shines through on this album and it's worth buying for the hilariously 80's photo of Norman "Fatboy Slim" Cook on the inlay card!
It's like a Northern drug this Housemartins lark! One listen and you're hooked!
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on 12 June 2013
Met High Whitaker the drummer on this album in my local the other week. Thoroughly nice chap. It reminded me how much I used to love this album (cassette tape as it was back then). Ordered it on CD and the memories came flooding back. Happy hour again!
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on 25 January 2003
Paul Heaton and Norman Cook have certainly followed very different paths since the glory days of this album and "The People Who.." For me neither of them have ever reproduced the energy and brilliance of these two seminal LP's. Even the Fat Boy with his super-popular sing-a-long-a dance music has never come close to emulating the raw exuberance of say "Get up off our knees" and has certainly never said anything as interesting. Paul Heaton's Beautiful South produced some nice ironic pop songs but surely he was at his best when belligerently battering the apathetic majority on songs like "Sheep: and "Sitting on a Fence" Never, in my opinion, has a band so overtly political, produced so many top tunes. Recently Paul has gone solo. I haven't heard any of his stuff yet but I hope he's gone back to his roots. Even better than that. Any chance of reforming just for a few gigs? London O Hull 4 is without doubt one of the albums of the eighties. Get it.
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on 12 October 2003
The year is I986, we're talking miners, we're talking Thatcher, we're talking a shortarse northern guy preaching record industry nationalisation - behold, if you will,the world of the Housemartins. Their brand of jangle pop is still felt in indie circles (just listen to Lucksmiths or Moxy Fruvous) and with good reason. Happy Hour is a euphoric piece of pop fluff until the penny drops and we're let into the eccentric and frankly exhausting pysche of P.D Heaton, draped in delicous harmonies and Smiths-esque guitar. The lyrics lack the same creativity as later Beautiful South efforts (in fairness, they had less to work with, the album is a socialist propaganda showcase to make Rage Against The Machine blush) but Heaton's vocal is in its prime. As a result, the radically different gospel and a cappella segment isn't half as cringeworthy as it should have been, with a soaring 'Just Like A Shelter' a personal highlight. Initially fast-paced with a tongue-in-cheek soulful climbdown, London 0 Hull 4 is an essential album for anybody who suspected the 80s had some substance under the gloss.
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