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Customer reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
8

on 27 April 2015
F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote seventeen Pat Hobby stories towards the end of his life (he died in 1940). Had he lived, it seems certain that Fitzgerald would have continued with the sequence. However, Richard Foreman has now brought Pat Hobby back to life and back onto the studio lot! The personality of Pat remains unchanged; he’s still a hang over from the silent movie days, but clinging on, desperately trying to recapture the glory days of the 1920s, when all a screenwriter had to do was compose some movie inter titles and invent the scenario. Pat is a lovable rogue; Richard Foreman’s stories are in the spirit of the original tales and are equally enjoyable.
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on 10 July 2012
The Pat Hobby stories are the funniest things I've read this year. Pat Hobby will make you cringe both at his actions - and also because you feel he is like you, or at least someone you know. The stories are very short, but as such can be re-read as though listening again to a favourite song. Loved the story Whisky Galore. Even though you sense what's going to happen, it's still funny.
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on 9 July 2012
Foreman does it again with these four sparkling snippets of Pat Hobby, the forty-nine year old screenwriter. Such a lot is packed into these short stories. They are brilliantly executed and perfectly paced. Because of the Fitzgerald connection they may be bracketed under "literature", but literature is rarely this much fun. His combination of pathos and wit keeps you laughing whilst cleverly peeling away the layers of Hobby's character. Perfect for your commute into work!
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on 3 July 2012
These stories have a "literary" air to them, but more so they should just be enjoyed for the laughter they inspire. These four stories develop our sympathy and understanding of Hobby. We see again how central drink is to his make-up and happiness (and lack of success). Also, he is not completely without a sense of decency.

As with the first collection of stories, The Return of Pat Hobby, Foreman saves the best till last and again the last line of the book brings a certain amount of redemption to the down and out.

Although short, each tale is a gem that you will probably read more than once.
Well worth taking a chance on, whether you have read Fitzgerald's original sketches or not.
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on 5 July 2012
The retro Hollywood feel of this book is just as resonant as that of previous stories but as Pat Hobby continues to struggle for the recognition he deserves as a screenwriter, he drinks more and works less. There's something even more tragic in Pat Hobby's decline since the last instalment but he is somehow as endearing as ever. The sincerity of the character and the elegance of Foreman's writing are sure to be a hit with any F. Scott Fitzgerald fan, again striking the perfect balance between respecting the original stories but writing something new and different.
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on 21 August 2012
Beneath the sharp but darkly comic exterior of Foreman's Pat Hobby stories lies the tragic tale of a hapless - and at times seemingly hopeless - screen writer. Foreman's ability to capture the essence of the age, vividly depicting the darker side of 1940s Hollywood, doesn't overshadow his ability to transcend time through a careful blend of comedy and pathos that is sure to amuse and move any contemporary reader. Wrestling with the legacy of such a literary great as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Foreman has successfully produced a series of short stories that really pack a punch, delivering a multi-layered character whose exploits provide endless entertainment in a format that makes them perfect for reading on-the-go. Few short stories deserve such attentive rereading and consideration, as the stories both play off against each other and Fitzgerald.
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on 15 July 2012
I was first recommended Foreman's Pat Hobby stories by a friend and now can't wait for every new instalment. These short tales not only pay their respects to Fitzgerald's originals but are really hitting a stride of their own. These stories follow the now familiar format as fame and fortune remain just out of reach for Hobby as his own greed and bad luck thwart him once again. Despite every reason to the contrary, I can't help but root for him- hopefully he'll get a break soon. This collection is a perfect length to read on-the-go. It's refreshing to find such quality writing in quick read.
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on 18 July 2012
Full of laughs, groans as well as poignant moments as Hobby (and whisky) stand in the way of his own happy endings once again. The first three stories in this collection show us different aspects of Pat Hobby's character: sloth, greed and gluttony. However, the last story in this book is my favourite yet as we get to see the flicker of humanity which, against the odds, keeps you cheering for this down and out. The individual stories, much like the collection are a perfectly poured blend of comic timing, tragedy and Hollywood in the 1940's.
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