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4.6 out of 5 stars
32
4.6 out of 5 stars
Long Road, Hard Lessons
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£2.96


on 3 June 2017
A cross between a travel, cookery and psychology book. Sometimes wanted Mark to stop agonising and taking the blame. Lovely descriptions of the countryside.
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on 31 January 2013
I picked this up for free on the Kindle and as they asked for a review in return, I feel it's only fair to oblige.

The journey that these to made is nothing short of incredible, to spend so long on the road living in the manner they did is quite remarkable and I'm incredibly jealous of their experience.

The book is a mixed bag. I liked it, it only took me a couple of days to fly through it and there was enough to keep me interested. However it could have been so much more. There is a lot of emotional stuff that could have been kept out.

I appreciate the book is partly about the father/son relationship, I just felt that it wasn't particularly insightful (teens are grumpy and don't appreciate their parents, successful businessmen are hard-headed and think their kids are ungrateful).

As a travel book it doesn't really stand out either, I've visited a lot of the places they cycled through and didn't feel that there was anywhere near enough description. Having kept travel diaries myself I know how easy it is to resort to constantly describing what you eat, but they mustt have seen and experienced so much more than is written in the book; encounters with others, misadventures etc.

Having said all of that, it is a worthwhile read and is inspirational and I congratulate the guys on their epic achievement, I know I couldn't do the same.
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on 16 October 2012
As you follow Mark and Sam on their journey from the UK to Japan it is fascinating to read about the high's and low's that they come across along the way. I love the way that you read Marks version of what happened and then Sam's and how different the journey can feel through a different set of eyes. This is an insight into different countries and cultures and the great people that they meet along the way. It is a great read about father and son relationship as well as the trials and tribulations of an amazing cycling experience, I didn't realise that there would be so many cycle repair shops en route LOL. An entertaining and interesting read for all.
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on 3 February 2013
I enjoyed the travel element of this journey hugely but groaned every time I read the dad announce that "Sam was quiet this morning ...". You just know that a page or two of self-indulgent and controlling comments is about to come from pushy dad. Sam often said that he would rather have done the trip alone or with his mates - he was right! But a great journey, well written and described - but not up there with the best of cycle journeys.
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on 23 September 2012
A psychological, spiritual and philosophical, inspirational connection between father and son. When I read the book, it almost felt like someone was speaking to me. His experiences are very well explained, I felt like I was living the experience. I would love to recommend this book to my friends, if only it was translated in French. I recommend this book to anyone, especially those wanting to experience the journey themselves.
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on 25 June 2012
So far, this is a great book! (I'm a third of the way thru'). Never a true word said using the phrase `there's something in it for everyone'; if you love to travel and want to learn a little about the countries they visited and locals they met along the way, if you love cycling (this book would equally be invaluable for those who choose an engine instead of pedals!), if you want to do the same kind of journey (with or even without one of your offspring!) and if you're a dad, (my son is 8 months old and I have much to learn. At times reading this book, it also made me reflect upon my relationship with my own father, which may not be a bad thing), if any of the above strikes a chord with you then give this book a try.
One of the messages I have taken from this book so far, is that if you're a successful businessperson with a loving family; who `says' you can't take some time out for a journey like this, it's what life is all about.
It's fascinating to read what goes thru' the minds of a dad and his son during the long hours on the road and to read about how they deal with all sorts of challenges on route, it's as interesting to read about how they deal with all the `good stuff' that happens too.
It's extremely well written and has a nice helping of humour along the way, I feel like I'm on the journey with them, both physically and mentally, I'm looking forward to the next country!
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on 30 November 2012
Mark and Sam have written this book honestly and from the heart. It is a great adventure and kept me interested all the way to the end. I liked their honesty and found it refreshing to read about a man who so obviously wants to improve his relations with his son while also working on improving himself!
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on 11 September 2012
I read this book in one sitting, which is unusual for me, and found it quite compelling. Like some other reviewers have commented, it can be enjoyed on several levels. The psychological journey unfolds in parallel with the gruelling physical journey. Descriptions of the many locations were fascinating and memorable and real eye openers - especially when father and son stayed in less than glamorous lodgings! Their stamina and openness is impressive. Recommended reading!
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on 23 April 2013
I've taken to the bike again. Given that I'd just finished Dervla Murphy's "Full Tilt" I was surprised that Pakistan had to be missed out. I was charmed by the descriptions of Japan, which I remember to be very true.
Of course the fact that the journey started in Dingle, my home town gave me cause to smile too.
I've been looking for a cheap 2nd hand Super Galaxy since I read this, and there may be a fifteen year old one in Scotland for me to test my dodgy knee on. Like the lads I'll do the training on enroute.
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on 16 April 2013
Chose 5 star as this book gave me a lot to think about; your past and future.
Recomend anyone who loves traveling in a different level or by different means.
Love this book. Couldn't put it down. Gives me inspiration to do somthing
like this and experience a new way in seeing how the other people in rural places. I can relate to this in my own life. What a book, I liked the part in their travels when Mark let his son go off on his own even if for a few days; must of been an experience for both of them trust,worry and a fantastic feeling meeting up like they did in that hotel like it was a coincident with the hotel manager introducing his Sam to Mark.
Read this book and you won't regret it.......and read how the other half of the world lives even in the run - down places that people can be still happy and think how luck you are plus what we take for-granted. The bicycle is the best transport to see the wold in even when it rains...... :)
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