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on 4 May 2013
Thirteenth and last of a thoroughly enjoyable b-movie series based on the Michael Arlen's book The Gay Falcon. Directed by William Berke and starring the charmingly smooth Tom Conway (who took over from his real life younger brother George Sanders in The Falcon's Brother) The Falcon's Adventure (1946) travels along at a fair lick as the Falcon (who has 'two soft spots, women and nightclubs') gets involved with beautiful women, dumb cops, mysterious foreigners, violent hoods and a plot involving a formula for industrial diamonds. Aided by his comical sidekick and 'fat headed ape' Goldie Lock (the wonderful Edward Brophy), this film also features Robert Warwick, Ian Wolfe, Jason Robards Sr and Steve Brodie in a familiar hood role. In The Falcon's world all females are damsels in distress, women are dames or babes, everyone eats in restaurants where there's a singer on very night, everyone travels by train, every other word is a wisecrack, people are drugged, slugged or moidered, everyone wears suits and hats (The Falcon even puts a blazer on before a fight), everyone smokes (this is even a plot point), the polis are useless and all black people are either stewards or shoe shine boys. Lasting just 60 minutes, this last Falcon adventure is hugely enjoyable and a fitting climax to a wonderful series.
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RKO's Falcon series came to an end after 13 films with 1946's The Falcon's Adventure, a decent entry that shows little sign of franchise fatigue as it fairly zips along at just over an hour with little fat. Once again George Sanders' more likeable brother Tom Conway is playing suave adventurer The Falcon - or rather The Falcon's brother - whose plans to get away from it all are interrupted when he comes to the rescue of a damsel in distress who's being kidnapped by a taxi driver. Her uncle has discovered a formula for cheaper artificial industrial diamonds and naturally there are any number of crooks who'll kill for it, starting with him, and just as naturally The Falcon is the cops' number one suspect.

With help from his rotund assistant Goldie Locke, played by Edward Brophy ("Look, bud, I got an honest face, ain't I?" "Look, senor, the best thing I can say about it is it's a face.") and hindered by assorted hoods, impostors and dodgy dames in New York and Miami, it's formulaic stuff but put together with the right kind of old school studio production line expertise to keep it enjoyable, with Conway's genuine charisma making it look a lot more classy than it probably should be. It can't make any claims for greatness, but it is fun.
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on 8 January 2017
Like The Others in the collection the stories are of good against bad very well acted and they actors work well together sit back and enjoy fully recommended
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on 30 March 2015
Met expectations
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