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3.9 out of 5 stars
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3.9 out of 5 stars
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on 11 February 2012
The Unburied Dead intoduces us to DS Thomas Hutton - he's drunken, divorced, ex-army, sleeping with the boss & has just landed slap bang in the middle of a brutal murder case. He's also a very engaging narrator - has an eye for the grotesque & a wicked sense of humour that just about keeps him sane. Put all this together & mix it with a big pinch of polis corruption & you end up with a thoroughly enjoyable & entertaining read.

I haven't read any previous Douglas Lindsay books but on this form that won't be the case for long. He has a great writing style and breathes new life into a well trodden genre. Brilliant
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on 13 February 2012
The hero of this tale is not at first glance your traditional hero. On the wrong side of forty and scarred by horrific experiences in Bosnia and dealing with a complicated love life and frequent overindulgence in alcohol, DS Hutton has to cope not only a dangerously deluded serial killer but corruption within the force. The characters were in the main very well drawn, particularly both Hutton himself, who was very believable, and the serial killer, although I felt less convinced by his female superior Miller. (Very) black humour coupled with a strong storyline make for a good read.
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on 7 February 2012
Really enjoyed this book. It is well paced, has a good plot and interesting characters. There are some explicit sexual references and fairly frequent use of profanity, but as the actress said to the bishop, 'they are necessary for development of the plot and the characters.'

The story is set in the west of Scotland and revolves around conspiracy and intrigue in the local police force(using the authors' vernacular - polis force). The action happens over the course of a week or so and intertwines the professional and personal life of the main characters into single suspense filled thread.

Hopefully there will be more books to come based on the main character.
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on 13 July 2014
This is the first I've read from Douglas Lindsay and I was suitably impressed. Whereas Stuart MacBride created a somewhat dysfunctional police team, Douglas Lindsay has excelled at exposing just how dysfunctional a team really can be. A decent story line particularly with DS Hutton flipping between his present role and nightmarish past.
Well worth a read and I'll certainly be reading more of Douglas Lindsay's works.
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on 27 July 2014
This book is clearly like Marmite (which I hate) - but I quite liked this book. Swearing doesn't bother me and I've read a few police detective books with plenty of industrial language and have a couple of cops in the family. So I'm pretty sure this DOES happen (despite what some reviewers have said)

To start with the style was a bit staccato. But once I'd got to about the 40% mark I had to know the outcome and read the rest in an afternoon.

It's a bit blokey and Hutton is a sh*t to all the women he's come across in his life - but the only redeeming factor is that he admits it, when his actions are cowardly. And he also admits he's not ready to tell anyone about the harrowing scenes he saw in Bosnia.

But I enjoyed it and didn't see the end coming. Will try the next in the series.
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on 7 July 2014
With 347 reviews already at the time of writing there's not a lot I can add.
I came to this as I've read much of the author's prior output, but nothing in this series.
With some writers when they try a different theme or begin a new series it's hard, if you've read the prior output, to not see the former clouding the latter. This isn't the case here - this is a gritty (without being gratuitous) detective fiction which interweaves a number of strands to a suitable conclusion, leaving enough open for some later developments.
And (at the time of writing) this is free. How can you lose?
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on 23 November 2013
I initially liked the style of this book starting off as it did with the author writing in the first person as both the hero and then the villain. That concept fell away though as the villain slipped into the background and this spoiled the initial effect. The procedural aspects of it were poor but might have been excusable or at least acceptable until the plot went beyond believable. The characters were a bit one dimensional and seemed to be obsessed with alcohol and sex to the exclusion of anything else. The end when it came was mercifully quick and gave the impression of being hurried and leaving a lot unfinished which sometimes works but in this case by then I no longer cared. Won't be reading the sequel I am afraid.
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on 13 February 2012
I particularly enjoy Douglas Lindsay's hilarious Barney Thomson books - 'The Unburied Dead' sees a slight change of direction and introduces a brand new central character in Detective Sergeant Thomas Hutton. He is a divorced vodka & tonic drinking, Bob Dylan devotee.

Making up more of the motley CID bunch attempting to investigate serious crime in Glasgow are DCI Jonah Bloonsbury, one time high flyer but now alcoholic has-been; DS Herrod, who's drunk with the desire to arrest anyone; DCI Dan Taylor who's consumed with doubt and depression; and Superintendent Charlotte Miller, the boss ready to work her way further up the ranks by bed hopping.

Starting just three days before Christmas when Ann Keller is murdered, mutilated by multiple stab wounds, the investigation continues over the period through to the New Year. The killer roams the streets; he's fixated on his ex girlfriend and wants to inflict pain on anyone vaguely resembling her as in his mind, she is any dark haired female he stumbles upon.

The author has a most entertaining writing style and supplies plenty of twist and turns in the storyline to keep readers engrossed and flicking the pages. Lindsay has devised a central character that I hope will be the foundation to a series.

This is superlative Scottish crime writing and a stonkingly brilliant read! Very highly recommended.
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on 6 June 2015
Had me flicking pages to try and find a page with something interesting on it. At first I thought it was going to be a Glasgow Rebus - no such luck, Edinburgh Rebus is a non stop read author. Maybe it was just me, but I gave up, first time ever I haven't finished a book. Very disappointed.
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on 26 August 2013
I started this book with the expectation of a decent Detective/Murder Mystery, and after 4 to 5 chapters stopped reading it. There is far far too much swearing and crude sexual references for my taste, and the portrayal of the Police goes beyond the pale, so many inefficient and useless people in one station is beyond belief. Now, before anyone calls me a prude! I am ex Army and still do my fair share of swearing but this book goes beyond acceptable levels, and adds nothing to the story, apart from padding it out with a few extra words.
Not my cup of tea I'm afraid.
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