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on 23 April 2017
For me the book was like stumbling upon a hidden cellar of old quality musical wine. Ingram painstakingly researched and picked rarities of one of the richest musical eras of the twentieth century. His list ranges from Prog Rock to Punk, all his picks are relevant and the info on them is interesting and fun to read. One gets a great insight to the times and what was going on behind the scenes and in the minds of the artists of that period. I can't wait to listen to his recommendations. Unmissable book for lovers of seventies music.
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on 27 September 2017
Maybe would have been better with 50 and a bit more detail about each? Lack of a tracklist a drawback too. Just not engaging although seemed a good idea.
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on 26 April 2017
Surprisingly i have afew from the list!
Good read... may try finding some of these albums....
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on 18 September 2017
In addition to some sterling inclusions, there are a number of oddities in here that really do not come under the 'rock' umbrella. Great read in places, boresville in others.
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on 1 June 2017
Plenty of gems here.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 18 April 2012
In the same way that, as an avid reader, I love books about books - as a music lover I also love reading books about music. This little volume comes with the warning - "Please note that all of these records are interesting, but not all of them are excellent! Tread carefully." However, there is much to explore here - 100 albums that have been neglected or forgotten, some by well known artists, some I must admit I have never heard of.

This book looks at rock albums in the categories of Blues Rock, Country Rock, Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Progressive Rock, Rock Fusion, Glam Rock, Solo Rock, Krautrock, Le Rock, Electronic Rock, Avant Rock, Pub Rock, Punk and Post Punk. This is a very personal list, but there is much that is worth of exploring and remembering. My favourite section was Solo Rock, giving Paul McCartney's first solo album and the excellent Nilsson Schmillson a well deserved mention. My favourite band name listed in this book has to be The Plastic People of the Universe. Great read and now I have to go and search through my boxes of old albums and see what I can unearth...
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on 18 March 2017
I don't understand the negative reviews. A book like this is clearly a personal selection, and you're not going to agree with all of them. But I discovered some interesting stuff through it. I also thought it was very well written - not "pseudo-intellectual" at all. Amusing with some interesting background too. The price is also very cheap, making it a bargain. I'd never heard of the author before, but will seek out more from him.
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on 7 July 2013
Some of the reviews to this book have been rather unkind.

This is a guy who clearly loves his Seventies music who is enlightening us to a few lost gems. Not over-detailed, but with a nice piece on each album, it has opened my eyes to a few albums I hadn't considered.

A similar book is '101 Songs to Discover From the Seventies'.
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on 13 November 2012
Neither a joyless trudge through the well-worn canon of 'classic albums you-must-hear' nor a joyless exercise in crate-digger oneupmanship, this book opens out, through what is basically a series of genre overviews and a series of record reviews, a whole new vista of understanding for the history of recorded music in the 1970s, an era in which the record industry was arguably at its most prolific, its most profitable and often at its most daring.

Born of a boundless and omnivorous joy in music and a playful intellectual curiosity, Matt Ingram uncovers and breathes life into an impossible to second-guess array of hidden-in-plain-sight gems that one might well find lurking in the charity shops and provincial record stores. It is Ingram's evident pleasure in music, and the LP record in particular, as a means of connection between people and between moments in history through the epiphany of the musical moment that makes this book worth more than a thousand obscurantist eulogies to 'must have' private press psych / minimal synth / krautrock LPs.
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VINE VOICEon 27 July 2013
We will all agree or disagree with at least some of the selections,but this is a thoroughly enjoyable trawl through the backwaters of '70s popular music. Some of the albums, 'I Want to see the Bright Lights Tonight' or 'Thank Christ for the Bomb' for instance, were very well known indeed when I was a student, others I had never heard of.
Well worth a couple of hours of any music lovers time, and it has prompted me to download a couple of long forgotten classics.
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