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Customer reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
9
Going Astray
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£2.32

on 24 October 2011
This book tackles some big questions about churches, faith, belief, commitment and family life. Some of the issues are familiar to me from my time as a member of a Christian church. I wrestled with some of them myself and ended up leaving the church. Moore's very well-drawn and believable protagonist has a different story to mine - one which held my attention from start to finish. Reading this book encouraged me to start to consider some of these things again. There are no easy answers, no trite recipes - just an honest exploration of one character's struggle with her conscience, her faith, her family, her church and her God. Very highly recommended.
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on 15 September 2010
I enjoyed the book, which was gripping and difficult to put down. The story is about the struggles faced by a family after their decision to join a religious commune. It is told from the viewpoint of the wife, describing the way she is torn by conflicting loves and loyalties, as she begins to question her beliefs and actions. The book builds to a thrilling conclusion.

I found that I really cared about the characters and the outcome, and I could relate to some of the situations portrayed. In fact, I am sure that many Christians will recognize the conflicts this woman faces. I encourage you to read this book. You will not be disappointed.
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on 28 January 2016
Let me say first off I am not a practicing Christian nor am I religious at all, so I wondered how I would get on with this novel. However, I soon found it fascinating as the storyline reveals the rather insidious methods some communal churches employ to gain control over their followers. I now find it easier to understand how normally level headed people can get drawn in and influenced by such cult churches. This book is a novel, but it reads like a memoir of real experiences. It tells the story of how Laura, a deeply Christian woman and her family are gently but firmly coerced into surrendering their individual rights and control over their lives when they join the New Wave church and move to a commune. Laura has reservations from the outset and these grow stronger as time goes by. Nevertheless, she still wants to believe that she and her family have done the right thing. It is only when the church leader takes matters into his own hands as regards the treatment of her little daughter, Mel (who has her leg in plaster for a dislocated hip) and things go horribly wrong that she makes the decision to try and escape. This, complicated by her feelings for another man, Bruce, leads to a tense and gripping denouement to the book. A very well-written and compelling novel, and one from which I learned a lot!
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on 5 February 2011
I was given this book for Christmas. To be honest, I don't "do" christian novels, and started reading it more as a duty - but quickly found I literally couldn't put it down and read right to the end in a couple of days. Fascinating insight into what could happen if extreme shepherding in a church were allowed to take over from focus on God and his word and his love.
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on 19 August 2010
Going Astray is a real page turner - I simply could not put it down. Laura and her family are drawn into a Christian community which at first seems perfect but quickly turns into a virtual prison where she fears for her children above all. The characters are well drawn and entirely believable and the story builds to a nail biting climax.
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on 27 January 2016
This story will make you really think about your beliefs and look deeply inside yourselves.
Laura is so worried about her baby daughter Mel's hip problems, operations and long stays in hospital, that she cannot really focus on anything else, not even her families imminent move to a religious commune. At Jayfield's Corner, an old house specially renovated for the families of the New Wave of the Spirit Church Worldwide, Laura gradually begins to question and doubt her new way of life and the motivation of the other church members.
The book is well-written and had me worried about its outcome, as I hoped that Laura would manage to find the strength to rebel against the cult and escape.
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on 23 August 2010
This is the tense and gripping story of a family that joined a new community church that bought a house in the country to which a number of people moved. The outcome was a story of isolation, control and restriction. The wife slowly realised the true nature of the control being exercised and she planned to escape. The whole story is a real page-turner and contains the important lesson that as a Christian one must be wise to examine thoughtfully the beliefs and practices before committing oneself. An important and challenging book amid some humorous scenes.
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on 28 September 2012
Having very little knowledge of Religious Communities/ Cults & not normally something I would chose to read I decided to give this book a go. I found myself surprisingly caring about the characters & wanting to know what happened next. The children living separately from their parents & being subconsiously indoctrinated I found particularly disturbing. Also I found the second rescue attempt of the son & his father a little far fetched but overall the book is well written & an enjoyable read.
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on 20 August 2010
Going Astray was a really thrilling read, while at the same time a very thoughtful exploration of some key spiritual questions, including faithfulness in marriage and an examination of individual expression or conformity in worship.

I finished this book in just over a day of pretty constant reading--a tribute to a story that keeps you coming back to find out what will happen next! That was more important to me than anything, but the author also managed to get you thinking along the way about some important questions of personal growth, spiritual expression, healing and marriage.

The book is narrated in the first person by a Christian mother of two children as their family makes the momentous decision to join in their evangelical church's move to communal living. She becomes increasingly uneasy with the way the commune is managed and her doubts and discoveries propel her family and the whole community to a terrifying conclusion.

I'd recommend the book to anyone. Some of the book is available for free on the author's website--I read it there first.
Going Astray is a thrilling and involving story that is very well told.
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