Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Kesha Shop now Fitbit



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 18 December 2014
Karren Brady writes this book as she speaks; it is authentic to her voice. She comes across as determined, single minded, impressive and yet rather cold and unsympathetic. She repeatedly uses the word relentless and this sounds up her approach to life and business - to go at it persistently with all your time and energy into you get what you want. She admires logic and avoid emotion, and there is almost no reflection about why she did what she did in the book or empathy for anyone else. She has learnt to be super self sufficient and unemotional,so that must be best for everyone.

She finds it unthinkable that people would turn off their work mobile phone or want to have a life outside work, and although she talks about balancing work with family life it is clear family doesn't get much of that pie. She goes to bed at 8 pm and works away from home several nights a week and does work on weekends too. In her early career she appears quite manipulative, telling lies to get in with the important people, and her friends and allies are not people I would hold up as role models! Similarly the aggression she describes in herself and her grandmother is worrying rather than impressive.

The book is also very dated to 2012 and her preoccupation with getting the Olympic stadium for West Ham.

So overall it is what is said on the tin, but I'd be very sad if this is a role model for women in business, as I think we have many strengths to offer that don't involve beating men at their own game but allow us to be warm and compassionate as well as driven, and show these traditional board room men there are better ways to do things.
0Comment| 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 May 2012
Normally the word 'sensible' doesn't get you running off to buy a book but it really does sum up Karren and her book. Other words that spring to mind are honest, down-to-earth, realistic and practical. She is definitely a strong woman but this book demonstrates that she is not a bitch and that lots of very hard work and maintaining her dignity throughout has allowed her to thrive in the workplace.

* Part biography (but not too much - just the good bits about what makes her who she is today)
* Part Business journal - great advice and ideas on how to do well in business
* Part Inspirational - I will definitely save this book and pass it on to my girls to read when they are older as I found myself agreeing with nearly all of what she said and she puts it over in such a way that made me think - "Yes! I totally understand where you are coming from"
* Brutually honest throughout - not many famous women are willing to state that they haven't done everything right and they've made mistakes both in their personal life and work life too but Karren does so I really warmed to her through these omissions
* Very unemotional - which was interesting but the more I thought of about it and the more I read about her, it was very understanding given the very male dominated situations she's been in
* Really enjoyed reading about behind the scenes at the Apprentice as I am a massive fan of the show (just wish Karren was allowed to speak more)
Would definitely recommend!
0Comment| 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 March 2017
I really wanted this book but i found it a bit of a let down. I found Karren repeating herself a lot throughout the book. I read about three quarters of it bit could not read anymore. Boring book and nothing to keep you interested in it. I really wanted to get to the end but it was so boring. I wouldnt personally recommend it
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 July 2017
I'm not a woman who thinks that every company should have women leaders, and Karen does have a strong belief of this view. This is why I gave it 4 ,instead of 5. Other than that I think this is a truly inspiring book on how to make your career work for you when you have a family. I would recommend this book.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 May 2017
Love the book from start to finish, it has actionable take aways which you can't find everywhere in business. Brilliant
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 December 2015
VERY GOOD
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 May 2016
Excellent book - good if you run your own business too - plenty of tips!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 March 2017
The my partner loves it
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 August 2017
good
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 September 2012
I read the first chapter which was full of incredibly sensible and down-to-earth advice about women succeeding in their chosen career. Genuinely wise and full of common sense. She writes very well about women as parents and how they have to balance the burden of raising children with their work commitments. My wife died when my children were young, so I can confirm that even some men have those problems.

The second chapter was about Karen's early days. How entrpreneurs are risk takers and hard workers. Hard work was emphasised a LOT. Almost every paragraph emphasised this point. Nothing at all wrong with that. If you want to succeed in anything, hard work will give you a much better chance.

What I found depressing was that Karen seemed genuinely pleased with herself when recounting how in her first day at school she pushed a boy out of the chair he was sitting in saying,"that's my chair." She also talks about her grandmother getting out of her car and punching other drivers in the nose if they were perceived to have cut her up, and how she was "always pushing me to the front of the queue".

Now my synmpathies are with the poor kid pushed out of his chair, the other motorists physically assaulted and the people who waited in the queue. We've all probably done (I certainly have) similarly unpleasant things in our lives but regret them and learn the lesson that other people count too.

I stopped reading at this point so maybe Karen goes on to say that actually the world isn't all me, me, me. I hope so but I didn't want to waste the time it takes to read the whole book to find myself disappointed.
22 Comments| 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)