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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 29 May 2016
This bargain of a volume contains Lodge’s three novels: “Changing Places” (1975), “Small World” (1984), and “Nice Work” (1988), all inspired by his own experiences as an academic. His observations are often wittily satirical, and his descriptions are very evocative, especially for any reader who has been through similar experiences or who knows the many locations in which the stories are set.

I have reviewed each of these novels separately on Amazon; but this collection benefits from an introduction by David Lodge, saying something about each of the three.

“Changing Places”: In 1969 Lodge, who was then a lecturer at the University of Birmingham, had spent six months as visiting associate professor at the University of California. He plots an English academic visiting an American campus at the same time as an American academic visits an English one. The difference between American and English ones was greater when he wrote the book in 1969 than it is today, when English universities have become much more like American ones, so that the novel in some respects has become something of a period piece.

“Small World”: In 1978 Lodge had attended a huge academic conference, with an attendance of 10,000, in Manhattan, and in the following year he attended two smaller ones, one in Switzerland and one in Israel. The participants at indulged themselves, away from the academic sessions, in all sorts of extra-curricular activities, and many of them competing for some Holy Grail like a well-endowed Chair.

“Nice Work”: This is set in 1979, the year in which Mrs Thatcher’s government came to power and wanted universities to be run like businesses and to become less dependent on government funding. Birmingham University, along with most others, tried to strengthen its ties with local industry. So for this novel Lodge uses the same formula he had used for “Changing Places”, this time with an academic visiting a business concern to learn how business works, and a businessman eventually reciprocating by spending time in the university.

My four star rating is the average for the three novels: four stars for the first, three for the second and five for the third.

So now see my separate reviews.
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on 16 November 2013
If the best novels give us insight into the social and sexual mores of our times and times past then this trilogy is up there with the best. Along with penetrating insight into British and American academic life and love, David Lodge gives us a hilarious anecdotes from the hippy era on the West Coast of America. An era supposedly of peace and love but in reality of campus occupations, "sit ins" and open and cruel exploitation of women in the name of free love. As the novels move through time the behaviour of academics changes in keeping with coming of the jet set age. But as you would guess nothing goes smoothly for long and our heroes live to regret their wildly extravagant behaviour. The last novel bring us right up to modern times of austerity measures and could be quite depressing except that the resilience of our academic heroine and our businessman counterpoint rescues the day (with a piece of unbelievable luck) and makes us feel that common sense and decency and respect for other people will win in the end.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 16 July 2010
As a David Lodge fan [see my report on Deaf Sentence ] I thought it was time I read some of his earlier work and this three for the price of one decent paper back tempted me . I am so very glad that it did .
David Lodge at his insightful , humorous best as we trace the trials , tribulations and ambitions of two entirely different academics from each side of the pond . The slightly stayed , but randy none the less , English lecturer and the more worldly and even more randy American professor. Set against the two countries very different worlds of academia and written by someone who knows of which he writes this is a very interesting and laugh out loud trilogy .
Written between 1975 and 1988 and spanning three decades they engender a nice feeling for the not so distant past with references to costs , communications and general living standards which beg the question : Is this really how we lived just 20 to 35 years ago ? It could take place in another century . Come to think of it : it did , but you know what I mean .
I mentioned that there is humor . There is also eroticism . And indeed humorous eroticism or erotic humor. Bags of both .
A compact volume for light , entertaining , holiday reading . It is a great buy .
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on 17 November 2016
These are well-described as 'campus' novels. Merciless portrayals of the self-absorption of academics is balanced by hilarious accounts of marital infidelity and musical beds on the conference circuit. I enjoyed the first and last volumes more than the middle one, but the whole trilogy gave much enjoyment.
If you cannot stomach semantic leg-pulling (aka academic BS), you may have to skip quite long passages but they make context.
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on 22 January 2013
I've been reading these books for some fifteen years or so - they never age or fail to delight. I suspect Lodge appeals more to male readers, but I'd heartily recommend them to anyone. He's a great oberserver of life, and you can't help but feel he's often taking the mick out of his own University career. But he's always knowledgeable and witty and just totally engrossing to read. You'll be challenged too - by reading Lodge, you'll discover things within your own heart you may not have realised were there.....
Kindle version is good - though there are a couple of Americanisms they have chosen to include. (Not, mercifully, the spellings though!)
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on 31 October 2012
Just finished the campus trilogy having stumbled acrooss David lodge after reading Deaf sentance. David Lodge is a terrific writer that entertains and indeed educates through his writing. His observations of life and situations are dealt with supberbly....I for one cannot get enough of him and now must search for more by him.

Wonderful relaxtion in a far too stressful world, get a cup of tea or nice glass of red, curl up in front of the fire and enjoy your book.
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on 27 January 2015
Re-read after many years. Still amusing and informative (?) about the bitchy world of academia. So much more rewarding than a lot of more modern fiction. Perhaps the storyline is a bit too much into wildly unlikely coincidences
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on 27 November 2013
This trilogy set is excellent value, 3 books in one and are terrific reads. David Lodge's writing style is enjoyable and the trilogy is related by character and circumstance, so you can read all the way through and enjoy the continuity of theme.
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on 25 August 2015
Like fine wine these three books have aged well. Tone perfect evocations of a lost world. Extremely funny. These novels belong on the shelf with Nancy Mitford and Evelyn Waugh and to be reread with love at the right times.
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on 6 November 2013
I enjoyed this book immensely. Well put together, good characterisation and scene-setting. Amusing situations and often laugh out loud moments.
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