Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's



on 24 April 2012
I stumbled across Mark Rice-Oxley's memoir whilst reading some of his articles on depression for the Guardian. Anyone with an interest in how depression can affect your life will enjoy reading his story. If you are suffering yourself then I think you will recognise a lot, if not all of the problems he encounters. Personally, I have found it helps to read as much as I can on the subject and am glad I came across this book.
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 6 September 2017
Excellent writing style, tragic, funny and very moving.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 19 April 2012
This is one of the best non fiction books I have read. Mark Rice Oxley writes very movingly about the effect his depression has on his family. it also offers some interesting theories on what causes depression and how to treat it. I'll be recommending it to my book group
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 April 2012
This is my first book review on Amazon despite having bought a lot of books over the years.

This is an excellent book for those in the middle of, recovering from, or just trying to understand what depression is and what it feels like. Mark also captures the essence of how it feels like to be a man, husband, son and father going through something thats very emotionally crippling in the prime of your life.

One of the most constructive things to help people through this is recognising that you are not alone in suffering this and Marks book helps make and highlight that point really well.

Everyone should read this and be inspired by it.
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 16 April 2012
I have just finished reading this book, which is a great personal achievement in itself. As happened to the author, Mark Rice-Oxley, when my "thing" descended I lost the ability to read, to listen to music, to be with people, to eat, sleep, in fact any motivation to enjoy anything about life at all. Mark manages to capture the pain, internal loneliness and bleakness of this cruel and debilitating illness, whilst maintaining the optimism that it will not last forever. It is not a melancholy book; there is plenty of humour and much to learn from it. I am glad the book came along at this point in my recovery, where I am beginning to accept and deal with my own "thing". Although everybody's experience of depression is different, I found myself identifying with so many of Mark's words, and also with his comments on the stigma surrounding mental illness. I have found this book informative, personally helpful, and a good read. Now, where did I put that recipe for low-calorie cheesecake!
0Comment| 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 27 April 2012
This is a fantastic book and incredibly helpful. It's funny,moving and brave; full of honest insight.

I would imagine anyone with depression would benefit from reading this book (I read it in conjunction with Tim Cantopher's excellent 'Depressive illness:curse of the strong'. Both have helped me to have some hope, reassure me that I am not alone with my illness and that what I am experiencing is felt by many many others.

This book helps to challenge stereotypes and stigma, reminding us that telling others is the best way to help ourselves and help others.

It describes the true horror of depression, the sinking loneliness, the dark moments of despair, the relentless feelings of loss. Any yet it also tells us that people can and do recover from depression, and for that I am deeply thankful to Mark Rice Oxley.
0Comment| 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 9 July 2016
I bumped into this book in the library after having read the late Sally Brampton's wonderful (oh, is that quite the right adjective) depression memoir Shoot The Dog. I thought to myself, I'm not sure I can take another one. But I took it out and sat on my bed, and soon I was engrossed in Mark's life and his very thoughtful, honest and intelligent analysis of breakdown and depression; his sensitively described bouts of the illness and his insight into treatments and approaches to depression. Now I wish I'd met him when living nearby. He feels like a friend. When you are really ill it seems so difficult to concentrate on anything, but this sort of book when well written and positively and honestly framed can really offer seriously useful help and perspective when you are coming out of it. It's also very useful for partners and relatives too, particularly the late section when he interviews his wife. He was, as he acknowledges very lucky he could talk about it and be open, something not always comfortable for some with relatives who are less enlightened.
If you are suffering, or know someone who is, this is well worth reading.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 May 2012
To say I enjoyed this, excellent, book might be a step too far. I found the author's frank account of the descent, anxiety and internal wrestling struck too many chords with parts of my own experience for this to be a truly comfortable read. Fortunately this is counter balanced with the easy charm and charisma of the writing.

This book serves as a reminder that this disease doesn't need a set of obviously traumatic antecedents, doesn't care that you objectively 'have it all'. It can still, if it chooses to, grab you, drag you into a dark alley and give you proper hiding.

But also, vitally, that it IS possible to climb out of the pit.
0Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 9 March 2013
We read to know we are not alone and Mark Rice Oxley's descriptions of his "nervous breakdown" will be familiar to anyone who has had the misfortune to feel as if they are falling apart. It is a beautifully written and ultimately optimistic book which shows that the pressures of modern life - trying to be perfect at work, at parenting, at relationships can have devastating effects. I think it is a book I will read again.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 25 April 2012
I found Mark's account of depression to be a real eye opener. As a word easily branded about these days and fobbed off as 'a bit down', it must have been such a hard battle. I believe there is so much more research to be done with respect to the physical condition that parallels the mental. I had no idea of the physical side of the illness and I guess I'm very lucky not to have been so low mentally, that I just can't do anything. I would love to have read a bit more about how your wife coped and just how close to the edge she found herself. How awful to watch the man you love deteriorate so dramatically in a relatively short period of time. If you have an interest in 'depression' read this book.
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)