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on 19 July 2012
The cover image sets the theme & mode of Henry Glick's adventurous survival of the Holocaust--an image of young, not very well dressed legs running through a town. Although this is not a concentration camp saga, it is a telling account of what it was like when the Nazis were about to invade a small Polish town and how a plucky teenager, given the blessing of those members of his family unable to accompany him for varous reasons, escaped the oncoming violence by making his way, with no papers, very little money or resources, over the nearby Russian border and elsewhere, the anti-semitism he encounters even from his own 'side' in the war, and the things he's forced to do when so displaced--work on a farm, in an industry, and finally serve in the Russian army to fight those very Nazis. His early anecotes of life in a simple and primitive eastern European village set a fascinating and poignant scene for 'the world before the war'. He suffers, though not physical torture, displacement, discomforts, painful separation from his family, and agonising ignorance until much later of what has become of them. It's not an 'arty' or literary book, but the heartwarming tale of a an ordinary victim of wartime turbulence, told honestly and simply by an extremely courageous and unflappable young man who never allows himself to be provoked into violence. It's a different, a unique perspective on how the Nazi invasions affected ordinary life and ordinary folk in Eastern Europe.
by Dr Lois Chaber, author and academic critic
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on 18 September 2013
Here is a great insight of what life was like for many young people during the Second World War - not much of a youth actually, but a long, tiring and lonely road towards the unknown where persecution is just around the corner.
More stories like this one should be made public as this may help us understand the situation that many young people trying to escape their home country currently in conflict are going through.
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on 19 October 2013
Really warm story, really recommend this to anyone!!
Thanks for such a nice true life , happy ending.
So nice to see such happiness from so much sadness
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on 14 March 2012
Quite a disappointing read compared to many others Ive read, not so much a survivor of the Holocaust as living through that period, his faith never gave him problems he was blonde haired and blue eyed, yes he fled from town to town but not in the way others had too, at the beginning I saw listed many many chapters, but these were individual incidents of just a couple of pages the majority of the book is taken up with his service as a member of the Russian Army from when he joined until he was demobbed. If you are expecting to read about life in a camp you will be disappointed. It is his story and well told but not what I expected or was looking for.
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