Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Ed Sheeran Shop now Shop now



on 12 December 2017
Fast delivery would use again thanks.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 29 April 2017
Fantastically well written, no ranting, just simple hard truths about religion. Anybody sitting on the fence should read this book now. Anybody confused by religion should read this book now. If only more people could open there minds and look at all the evidence presented here, the world would be a safer, happier, and more pleasant place to live.
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 24 November 2017
A very thought-provoking book by the controversial Christopher Hitchens.

I say controversial only because those that believe in God or a god would find him so. He makes some valid and at times very convincing points but I do take exception to the book's title in connection with its content. Its subtitle I am happy with because the book does indeed cover the reasons why religion does poison <i>some</i> things (of which I will talk about later).

The main title, however, is the part that bugs me. God and gods have absolutely <i>nothing</i> to do with religion. You cannot blame God, an alleged ethereal being, for the man-made religions of the world, any more than you can blame (talentless) reality TV stars for their millions of followers. You can argue that these religions were created by God but actually, they weren't. Man created them. There is no evidence whatsoever that God has said to any religious sect, "This is how you should lead your life". Our only word on that is from a fellow human being. This is evident in the bible, as stated by Hitchens, when Moses is commanded to write down the ten commandments by God. He then goes down the mountain and in front of the multitude smashes up the tablets and declares his own rules.

Just to clarify, I am agnostic. To me, this means that I don't believe there is a God but I hope there is. Not because I'm hedging my bets but because I would love one day to see friends and family again, that are no longer here. Unfortunately, I don't think this will happen though, but what have you got, if not hope?

Therefore, I believe that those that are <i>religion-free</i> have a more joyous outlook on life than those that don't. This is from what I, personally have seen with my own eyes and obviously may not be the case for everyone. I have nothing against any religion. I have read the bible, the Koran and other religious works with an open mind. I intend to read some works on Buddhism and to re-visit the Koran again, as the last time I read it was as a teenager whilst living in Abu Dhabi. I have friends devoted to all the major religions; Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Sikhism, ​and Buddhism. I respect their views and they respect mine. I have been into their holy buildings and have been awe-struck by the beauty and devotion to such buildings. I find them incredible and love listening to stories of their own journeys through life based on their religions. It is genuinely fascinating and I totally respect their views. After all, as I keep telling them, it is only an opinion after all. What I disagree with, with religion is, the hatred for fellow men and women based on opposing beliefs. I find this incredible since no-one knows anything for sure. Even if they think they do.

Generally, I find Hitchens a little less arrogant than Richard Dawkins. I hate the way that Dawkins sneers and mocks those that believe in the Creation and for that, I disregard his viewpoints and tend not to read his books. Hitchens' philosophies, to me, seem more respectful and it is for this reason that I will look into reading some of his other works in due course. This book, however, is well worth a read, whatever your religious viewpoint and I would surmise within a book club or amongst friends would be a great talking point.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 29 October 2017
Revisiting Christopher Hitchens' book 'God Is Not Great' ten years after I first read it has been
an interesting experience. It remains perhaps the most eloquent and elegant argument against
religion and god(s) ever written; a beautifully crafted monument to humanism, common sense
and the debunking of any inherent belief in manmade myth-making. This is not to say that secular
and totalitarian systems of thought have historically provided any kind of clear moral guidance as an
alternative. Mr Hitchens is as damning of the crimes against humanity delivered by aberrant political
movements as he is of narratives which have any kind of all-seeing, all-powerful deity at their centre.

The book continues to be essential reading for anyone who cares about man's place in the universe.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 November 2016
Should be required reading. However much I watch Hitch on YouTube, it's still great to read, when I can spend more time thinking. The book arrived well within schedule.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 10 February 2017
A brilliant book that deserves a read.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 25 July 2017
I've probably seen most of the content on YouTube, but that takes nothing away from this excellent book.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 December 2016
An excellent and thought provoking book, from an excellent seller.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 19 March 2016
Superb book - a brilliant polemic against religion and its obvious evils. A must read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 26 June 2016
Tears a strip off the filth and horror of religion quite deservedly even if it does come across as a bit of a rant in some places. But then, confronted with the unfathomably poisonous mass hallucination that is religion, who can blame him?
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)