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on 7 May 2015
I am not a person who normally gives reviews to the outside world BUT!!!
The Way - What an incredible film, a tale about the bond between father and Son, a film full of Strength, Courage, Compassion and Love, my absolute favourite. If i can pursued just one person to watch it, my work will be done here
11 Comment| 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
This could have been a sloppily sentimental, mawkish Hollywood movie. Or it could have been a deeply depressing European art-house film full of bitter regret. Instead, `The Way' veers to neither extreme and treads a careful path somewhere in between.
`The Way' examines the nature of pilgrimage, the father-son bond, interaction between strangers, the reality of loss and how different people deal with it, and how new friendships can develop from the most harsh moments in life. The first act is extremely moving, as Martin Sheen's character struggles to cope with his son's sudden death. The father is wrenched from his comfortable middle-class life in suburban American, hurled into motion by the news that his wayward 30-something son has died while undertaking an extreme pilgrimage on foot across 500 miles of Spanish mountains.
From then, the rural landscape becomes one of the central characters in the film; harsh, beautiful, threatening, supportive - and sensitively captured and revealed in a series of segments which follow Sheen's footsteps through rain, shine and suffering. He's joined by other pilgrims on the trail and encounters a cross-section of humanity at way-stations along the route.
`The Way' isn't entirely free of cultural stereotypes, So the Dutch pilgrim carries half a pharmacy of recreational chemicals around with him; the Irish writer is a fast-talking braggart; the gypsies dance by firelight and lean toward light-fingered habits but underneath are a sensitive, honourable people, and so on. But the Americans laugh at themselves, and the grieving father isn't portrayed as a kind of saint; his feet are made of clay, too. And he's man enough to admit it.

At the final resolution, `The Way' offers an affirmation of lives worth living, of the value of the journey for itself rather than mere dashing to a destination. It captures several moments of startling sorrow, and Sheen's performance should not be missed. But this is not a po-faced movie about religion, nor a self-indulgent dirge. There are plenty of lighter moments of laughter (and James Nesbitt gets one of the best introductory speeches we'd heard in a long while).
The delicate scenes between (real life) father and son Sheen and director Estevez are extremely poignant, too. They perfectly capture the intimate yet distant relationship between the generations.
Definitely a film not to miss.

NB: there is a straight DVD available, as well as the import Blu-ray.

9/10
11 Comment| 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 February 2017
This film is breathtaking. The cast are high quality actors and perform with sincerity. The film deals with great sensitivity both the death of a child and the belief of pilgrimage travellers. The photography is amazing too. A GREAT film
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
This could have been a sloppily sentimental, mawkish Hollywood movie. Or it could have been a deeply depressing European art-house film full of bitter regret. Instead, 'The Way' veers to neither extreme and treads a careful path somewhere in between.

'The Way' examines the nature of pilgrimage, the father-son bond, interaction between strangers, the reality of loss and how different people deal with it, and how new friendships can develop from the most harsh moments in life. The first act is extremely moving, as Martin Sheen's character struggles to cope with his son's sudden death. The father is wrenched from his comfortable middle-class life in suburban American, hurled into motion by the news that his wayward 30-something son has died while undertaking an extreme pilgrimage on foot across 500 miles of Spanish mountains.
From then, the rural landscape becomes one of the central characters in the film; harsh, beautiful, threatening, supportive - and sensitively captured and revealed in a series of segments which follow Sheen's footsteps through rain, shine and suffering. He's joined by other pilgrims on the trail and encounters a cross-section of humanity at way-stations along the route.
`The Way' isn't entirely free of cultural stereotypes, So the Dutch pilgrim carries half a pharmacy of recreational chemicals around with him; the Irish writer is a fast-talking braggart; the gypsies dance by firelight and lean toward light-fingered habits but underneath are a sensitive, honourable people, and so on. But the Americans laugh at themselves, and the grieving father isn't portrayed as a kind of saint; his feet are made of clay, too. And he's man enough to admit it.
At the final resolution, 'The Way' offers an affirmation of lives worth living, of the value of the journey for itself rather than mere dashing to a destination. It captures several moments of startling sorrow, and Sheen's performance should not be missed. But this is not a po-faced movie about religion, nor a self-indulgent dirge. There are plenty of lighter moments of laughter (and James Nesbitt gets one of the best introductory speeches we'd heard in a long while).

The delicate scenes between (real life) father and son Sheen and director Estevez are extremely poignant, too. They perfectly capture the intimate yet distant relationship between the generations.
Definitely a film not to miss.
NB: there is a straight DVD available, as well as the Blu-ray.

9/10
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on 21 March 2016
This film was a wasted opportunity. The characters are pretty one dimensional, the dialogue is clunky and clichéd and many of the poignant moments feel false and forced. A good idea let down by a poor clichéd script and some ham fisted direction and acting.

Annoying by the end and pretty forgetable. If your looking for a meaningful journey, look elsewhere.
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on 26 April 2016
One of my favourite films. Sensitive, dramatic, sad, funny, beautifully rich characters all with their own baggage and acted out by a fine selection of actors from right across the board. Casting was perfect.

Great price, Great package, Great delivery!

Thank you
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on 2 June 2015
Having now walked nearly all of the Camino (the Way) I think that it is a great way to get a feel for the journey and the wonderful scenery and camaraderie that you experience. As a story it is a bit lightweight but I gather from the credits that it is a mix and match of possibly real stories and that may be why it seems to lack substance. However the key message of the Camino is there, it isn't about getting to Santiago it is about the journey.
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on 10 November 2016
My brother has just walked the Camino and mentioned that many of the Americans that he had met had seen and enjoyed this film. I thought that it was excellent and captured both the beauty and the endurance required to stay the course and was emotional without being overly sentimental. The scene in the Cathedral is pure religious theatre but clearly realistic. For those who have not seen the film yet, the interview with Martin Sheen about how the film came to be made is very interesting and thought provoking.
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on 27 June 2016
Great film, beautifully written and directed by Emilio and acted by Martin, but not too representative of the actual journey. I have walked The Way three times and although beautiful the film does not show the hardships that may be encountered. Walking for up to 5 weeks is no easy task, but it's the best adventure I ever had. You meet wonderful amazing people from all over the world that you may be friends with for life.
Watch the film, fall in love with the idea of the Camino but do your research and do some training. If the Camino calls to you then you won't ever settle till you have walked the way. Don't regret that you didn't go, it's amazing.
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on 6 January 2016
A well acted film, pathos, humour , looks in the dark places that pilgrims take to the Camino to find an answer for.
Fantastic views of rural Spain and the route to Santiago de Compostela.
Gives a good representation of how a pilgrimage can bring people together and how they deal with the demons that drive them.
"The Way" I would recommend to any one considering the Camino simply to show the conditions on the route.
An all star cast, a good story, lots of emotion, what more can a film offer. Buen Camino.
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