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on 30 April 2013
This was very different,very funny and very sad. Mortimer Snr is a gifted writer and his pen portraits of his family, friends and social class are at the same time hilarious and poignant. His is a dying generation of men who had a difficult war in their youth and who find the freedoms of modern society hard to fathom. His love for his family is paramount and he tries hard to counsel his wayward son, and the letters mean that the communication is never broken. I laughed out loud several times in the course of reading this book, and I liked Mortimer Jnr's wry comments at the end of each section. One thing, however;why do the English upper middle classes never seem to mind that their dogs leave messes in the house, on carpets etc? It's one thing to be charmingly eccentric but quite another to be unhygienic! I will certainly read the next family member's published letter collection.
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on 13 August 2012
I could not put this book down, the most articulate and amusing letters written to a son. They reminded me of my father with a most ascerbic wit who made the ordinary laughable. I laughed out loud the whole way through this book. It will be hard to find anything to match it. This is a book that I will always keep and read again and again.
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on 2 December 2012
A lovely insight into how it is, or can be, in the shires post war. Mortimer senior writes a beautiful letter, nowadays these would be lost in the depths of a computer. The wayward son while not listening to his father had enough respect for his father to keep the letters and what letters. Like everyone else I found them very witty and heartwarming and as he aged the little snippets of local gossip he slips in. I would have liked to know more about Charlie and what he is doing, if anything, with his life.
I was intreagued enough to find out who Lupin was and brought a Diary of a nobody, written in 1892, republished as a Wordsworth Classic. It is a small book and every bit as interesting and funny as Dear Lupin.
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on 30 October 2015
The title is no exaggeration. Charlie Mortimer was seriously wayward for most of his adult life, but his father never ceased to love him, advise him and above all, believe in him, even when this optimism was clearly misplaced. Roger Mortimer was a fine writer and his letters to his son made excellent use of his gifts. Relatives and friends come to life on the page and there are many laugh out loud moments. I absolutely loved it.
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on 13 August 2012
A very amusing book of letters from a father to his son
Both funny and sad, but also uplifting.
Thoroughly recommend it to all.The Diary of a Nobody (Penguin Classics)
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on 19 July 2012
Wonderful Book and would recommend the hardback version as with the discount little price differential.
The sort of Book to hand down to a favoured friend / relative in due course. Understandably has featured for many weeks in the Best Selling Charts.
Suggest you try to avoid reading in a short time span but rather dip in as and when and take in the quality.
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on 1 May 2013
Reading this book made me wish I'd been lucky enough to meet Roger Mortimer (the letter writer). Even though his son, Charles (and the co-author) must have been a never-ending source of frustration to him, his gentle chastisements are always laced heavily with his wonderful humour. Smashing book. :-)
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on 27 September 2012
This was a thoroughly enjoyable book. Written with humour and empathy. There were times when you wondered at the patience and understanding shown by the long suffering father and longed for a happier outcome in the lifestyle of his son and co-author but then life is not like that - as we all too often discover!
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on 23 December 2013
A charming read which I didn't want to end. If only I could have the same tolerant outlook with my own children.
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on 12 September 2012
Dear Lupin...: Letters to a Wayward Son
I write this as the father of a son who has been equally wayward at times early in his adult life. This is a fascinating read, amusing, moving and, sometimes, quite irritating. We follow Lupin's progress in life by reading his father's letters to him. In spite of everything the love and the bonding between the two is clearly revealed. A jolly good read.
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