Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Fitbit

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
24
4.7 out of 5 stars
Price:£37.79+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 22 December 2016
Ektar is a 'modern classic' and possibly one of the best, if not the best colour C41 film you can get. The colours are excellent, more saturated than that of Kodak Portra of course and also probably more saturated than other films like Fuji Superia too. It prints and scans really nicely providing you use a good scanner and print onto good paper of course, it certainly scans a lot better than some E6 films like Velvia. Ektar is definitely my 'go to' film now, I'd shoot it in preference to Portra for the more saturated colours and Velvia because it's a lot easier, faster and cheaper to process. Films like Fuji Superia are great on a budget, but whilst Ektar is more expensive I think it is worth it. Even though it's only 100 speed, if you have a lens with a large aperture like the 50mm f/1.8 I used, you can use it in some low-light situations and the shutter speed remains relatively fast meaning you don't get too much blur, though if you want to shoot in low-light handheld then faster film would be more ideal. Have a look at some photos I've taken with it and see what you think! They're all shot using a Nikon F80 and Nikon 50mm f/1.8G lens and are all unedited scans.
review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 February 2012
Great film! I used to be a big fan of Fuji's PRO160S as it would render great colours and fine grain. But then, Fuji decided to discontinue it.
Luckily, I discovered this great film from Kodak. It has the best colour rendition of anything I've used. I'd say it's every bit as good as Fuji PRO160S but has the advantage of being still available.

Hopefully, being as this film was first produced in 2008 (ie: well into the digital age) Kodak will keep it in their product range for some time to come.
I'm especially impressed with how well the colours look even in all sorts of artificial light. The above snaps were just crops and rejects that i took at a boat show, yet they look very natural.

One thing I've noticed with Ektar is that the colours get richer with longer exposure times. In the product pics I posted, the picture of the busker on the bridge was shot at about F2.8 while the one of St Paul's was at F11. Both on the same kit, both within 10 minutes and 100 yards of each other.
Obviously the smaller apertured longer exposure has helped make the colours better. The indoor shots have more vivid colours because of this too, whereas the shop window one was F/2.8 on a bright day and quite a fast exposure. It still has very lifelike colours, but not as saturated as the ones shot at the boat show.

Good stuff! Thanks Kodak. I now have plenty of this in the 'fridge and will continue to use it as my default film choice wherever possible.
review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image
66 Comments| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 March 2017
Best film you can buy. Great colours, reminds me of Kodachrome.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 April 2012
I've gone back to Film photography having acquired a Nikon F5 and a Nikon 50mm F1.4 AF-D at a bargain price. I've tried Fuji ISO 200 film both the Superia and the C emulsion. Both have been extremely disappointing-essentially the results an ISO 400 film would give without the speed. I've long been biased against 200 speed anything with the lone exception of XP-2-that rated at ISO 200 is nice.

I've tried getting my favourite emulsion Fuji Superia Reala which was rated at ISO 100, but Fuji has discontinued it.

My previous experience with Ektar (the old ISO 25) about 20 years ago was brilliant but to obtain the best results it had to be sent to a Professional Lab.

Kodak are claiming the grain is as fine as the older ISO 25 and by updating their Tabular or T-Grain technology offers outstanding results with of course the two stop advantage. This is as slow as I'll go handheld, anything slower should really be used with a Tripod.

So off I went, having acquired three rolls of this Ektar 100.

I spent a good three hours snapping away in Abbey Park Leicester, taking pics of a variety of scenes both low and high contrast.

The results?

SPECTACULAR!

Vivid but not artificial colours, brilliant contrast rendition, outstanding sharpness, no grain and the ability to reproduce subtle tones and textures like Cherry Blossom. The Fuji film in comparison was all soot and whitewash-very high contrast and looked blasted AWFUL!.

Any downsides?

A couple or so things to be careful of.

First, this film despite it being Colour Negative really does benefit from spot-on exposure. Treat it with respect and it will do the same for you.

Secondly, you need to have it processed (like the old Ektar 25) at a Professional Laboratory. A Professional Lab like Lab 35 in Luton (there are others btw) will squeeze the very last smidgeon of quality out of it. Provided your technique is up to it you can assured of truly outstanding results.

If you use a high quality 35mm SLR/Lens combination like a Nikon F5+50mm F1.4, use a tripod, take care with metering, focus to perfection (manually), stop the lens down to about F5.6 use the mirror lock up and a cable release to take the picture, I can see no reason at all why enlargements of up to 30x20 aren't possible. OK, yes a Medium Format camera such as a Mamiya 645 etc WILL be better in this capacity but my point is that this is the first time in Colour Negative history an enlargement of this size has been possible in the 35mm format at ISO 100 anyway. The old Ektar 25 would have probably managed it as well

Thirdly the superiority of this stunning emulsion does come out using camera+camera manufacturers own fixed focal length lenses.

Finally it is almost impossible to obtain via the High St nowadays. So if Ektar interests you, you have the perfect online retailer-Amazon.
22 Comments| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 June 2012
Since I've been using film I have used many different types. After a long time and a lot of experimenting I have come to the conclusion that this is by far my favourite film. It produces warm, sharp, beautiful images. I have used it on professional shoots and for every day use and it has never let me down. I'd recommend this film to anyone.
Here's an example of some photos I shot using this film - [...]
BUY IT!! You won't be disappointed.
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 August 2013
This film has really good colour and tones and comes out really well. I bought a 5 pack for a holiday to Croatia and it didn't disappoint.
11 Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 September 2013
Only decent print film left on the market. Not quite as good as late lamented Fuji Reala but much better than the 200 or 400 speed stuff which is all you can find on most High Streets.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 June 2013
would not use again, always been used to fuji reala 100 and cant get it any more so thought i would try Ektar - big mistake or a bad batch.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 October 2013
Item ordered on 1st Oct and arrived VERY securely and strongly packaged on 4th October - by Royal Mail's Recorded Delivery service - POST FREE! And well ahead of the forecast delivery delivery date. The film is 100 ASA fine grain film which I will look forward to using. I love old film. I'd never ever want use digital camera. Nothing matches good fine grain film. Films - all five - arrived with an expiry date of 2015 which can easily be extended by at least a year or more if kept cool in a 'fridge.

Laurence
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 April 2013
I have discovered this print film some times ago , up to now with different machine it has ensured wonderful print quite similar to the digital.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.
See all 6 answered questions


Need customer service? Click here