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on 19 September 2017
This book is the most detailed information I have read regarding Midway.
It examins, the carriers of the US and Japan, their performance, and of
course the differing fighting techniques used by both fleets.
Reading this, shows just how vital was the ten centimetre Radar on the
US ships. The Japanese discovered the early magnetron, the yagi antennae
the British improved on them, and passed them to the US.
An excellent book on Carriers and their aircraft, together with operating proceedure
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on 1 February 2017
Excellent book. Very well written and captivating.
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on 17 October 2017
Excellent and absorbing account.
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on 28 October 2017
Want to get a truth about the battle of Midway then this is THE BOOK that cuts through the huge and well accomplished cover up carried out by the defeted humiliated and duplicitous Japanese Military after The Second World War.. so now after all this time we get a truth of a sort. It's a one off though amongst the happenings the occurrences and events of this premeditated War. The Battle of The Bulge will aways be a triumph of wishfulness over actuality an orchestration conducted by The American Military to ensure that their self serving untruthful maniulations will travel onwards through the ages to ensure them to be the browned off issue from the great posterior of posterity...
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on 25 May 2009
Publishers claim the term 'definitive' for many works of military history these days, however in this case I think the boast may well be justified. ThHe authors, whose admirable and fascinating website on the Imperial Japanese Navy illustrates their passion for the subject, set out to de-bunk some of the popular myths around this famous battle.

I for one had taken as accepted wisdom the interpretation of the faulty spotter plane sealing the Japanese fate, whislt the loss of the American torpedo squadrons was a heroic sacrifice which left the Japanese carriers denuded of high-level air cover just in time for the avenging Dauntlesses to pounce: it is a delight to have these interpretations challenged, the more so in a work that blends vast technical content with flowing, gripping narrative - a very difficult combination to pull off. Within two chapters, I had ordered Tully's new(ish) work, Surigao Strait. If it's half as good as this, I won't be disappointed.
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on 25 March 2006
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, particularly with its unusual approach of viewing the battle from the side of the Japanese. I was less enamoured by the authors' attempt to fix the book's viewpoint to the carriers themselves (thus, when the Japanese aircraft leave on a raid, we hear nothing further, apart from a few radio messages, until they return and can be debriefed). While clearly designed to emphasise the lack of information available to the Japanese commanders, I felt that this writing device unnecessarily impeded the reader's understanding of the battle.
I was also distracted by an occasionally lax writing style. As an example, at one point it is claimed that the commander had little time to "internalise" the problem.
Nevertheless, the above issues are minor. What comes shining through is the breadth and depth of the authors' research and their clear determination to produce an account that is factual and unbiased. By clearly explaining the mechanics of Japanese carrier operations of the time (without boring the reader), the authors are able to convincingly dispell many of the misconceptions and fallacies regarding this great battle.
This is an excellent account of the Battle of Midway, presented in an unbiased and logical fashion and which uncovers many previously disregarded aspects of the battle - thoroughly reccommended
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on 12 November 2012
This is a splendid book. In sharp contrast to too many recent military history books which have a tabloid approach ("turning point of the war" etc)and which rely on secondary or tertiary sources or which consist of regurgitating oral accounts ("the historian as copy typist"), this is an exhaustively researched account of Midway which corrects many standard accounts and which provides a thorough and carefully reasoned analysis of the Japanese operation without losing sight of the human dimension.
A model of how history -not just military history- should be written.
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VINE VOICEon 13 October 2007
The book aims to reappraise our understanding of the Battle of Midway and to correct a number of myths which linger in Western accounts of events.

The evidence that the authors present is compelling and provide a richer understanding of the battle. The thesis does not change the basic facts of the battle, but trims the sails of some of the more dramatic elements, such as the fact that the Japanese carriers did not have deck loads of planes ready to take-off just before the fateful dive-bomb attack. The planes were fuelled and armed, but in hangers below the deck, so their decisisve role in the fate of the ships remains the same - once the bombs hit they posed a massive hazard, but they didn't have the Hollywood quality of being about to be launched.

The general story of how the battle came about, the Japanese navy and the culture which formed it were extremely interesting. Some of the attitudes and choices which seem almost imcomprehensible - such as senior officers insisting that they go down with their ships rather than seek to fight another day or the sheer overblown complexity of the battleplans - are given a proper context and explanation. It is this element of the book that provides the greatest insight and interest.

Generally speaking the book has a flowing, accessible written style and considering the book's emphasis on some of the more technical aspects of the battle including naval doctrine it's extremely readable.

I did wish that the authors didn't feel that they had to repeat quite so often that they were about to share another stunning insight misssed by Western scholarship since 1942, but this is a minor quibble with a book that does have something new to say about an extensively written about battle and real insight into the nature of the Imperial Navy.

A recommended read for anyone interested in the naval history or who is intrigued by a glimpse into a very alien organisational culture.
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on 25 March 2006
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, particularly with its unusual approach of viewing the battle from the side of the Japanese. I was less enamoured by the authors' attempt to fix the book's viewpoint to the carriers themselves (thus, when the Japanese aircraft leave on a raid, we hear nothing further, apart from a few radio messages, until they return and can be debriefed). While clearly designed to emphasise the lack of information available to the Japanese commanders, I felt that this writing device unnecessarily impeded the reader's understanding of the battle.
I was also distracted by an occasionally lax writing style. As an example, at one point it is claimed that the commander had little time to "internalise" the problem.
Nevertheless, the above issues are minor. What comes shining through is the breadth and depth of the authors' research and their clear determination to produce an account that is factual and unbiased. By clearly explaining the mechanics of Japanese carrier operations of the time (without boring the reader), the authors are able to convincingly dispell many of the misconceptions and fallacies regarding this great battle.
This is an excellent account of the Battle of Midway, presented in an unbiased and logical fashion and which uncovers many previously disregarded aspects of the battle - thoroughly reccommended
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on 20 December 2009
To be honest I wasn't sure there was much new on the battle of Midway, but I was very wrong.
This book is not only a superb re-assessment of the Japanese efforts to invade Midway and draw American carriers into a battle but is written mainly from the IJN view point. It debunks a number of common myths and is a great read. Tells much of IJN doctrine and carrier methods,
If you own any number of books on Midway and Japanese carrier tactics you'll still need to add this to your library.
Highly recommended.
David Carter
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