Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
115
4.6 out of 5 stars


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 23 October 2012
There are so many books written by people who've lived in another country for a while and then think they might make some money writing about it. But this is one of the best!
Japan is one of the few places left in the world where a Westerner can still experience a real culture shock. Sam lived there for two years, and the book is his account of that time. Alternately moving, funny, sad and always eye-opening, it holds you from beginning to end.
Having never visited Japan I cannot comment on the accuracy of some of the author's writing, but it is always clear what are factual happenings, and what are his own thoughts and opinions.
Overall, a great read, and, I would think, essential if you are going to Japan.
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 March 2017
Great book with wonderful glimpses of small town and rural Japan. Excellent descriptions of some lesser know beauty spots, and a humorous view of two cultures trying to blend at the level of ordinary individuals.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 June 2017
Intriguing story I learnt so much about rural Japan and ordinary people.the descriptions of the countryside were very real and I enjoyed how he fitted into a different culture so well
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 June 2014
I did enjoy this book as it filled in a gap in my life, I nearly did the JET scheme but opted out in the end. I have always wondered about that decision as I went off to start my professional working life instead. The book gives great insights into living in Japan and is written with lots of fun anecdotes and some less fun experiences shared in an open and honest manner. Worth buying.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 June 2012
Japan is not somewhere I would have thought of visiting or to be honest reading about but this book has changed my mind on both counts. Its an enjoyable book, to be honest I did think it was going to be more about the authors new job teaching in Japan rather than his travelling adventures but it was well worth the read.A bit amusing in places and very discriptive of his new life in Japan.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 January 2012
I bought this hoping it would remind me of my recent trip to Japan and wasn't disappointed. The book is written in a casual and very funny style that made it very hard to put down. The only small downside is that it was a little short and I managed to finish the book in a day however it is one I will certainly be reading again soon.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 August 2014
A brilliant funny sad and interesting look at life in japan. Makes me want to go myself. Well done Sam San
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 June 2013
There is one scene in the book, where the author and a young Japanese women are kayaking in a lake when their conversation turns to their perceptions of 'beauty' in Japan. The answer is surprising and gives an insightful glimpse in the psyche of many Japanese and their approach to tourism. The westerner's conventional appreciation of bountiful, untamed landscapes and hers - wholly detached from nature and far removed from the wilderness they find themselves in.

In many ways this sums up the book: one foreigner's ongoing interpretation of Japan. This is both its strength and its weakness. For much of the time reading 'For Fukui's Sake' we see Japan through the eyes of a foreigner for whom Japan represents his first ever experience living in a different country. The observations are well written, but frequently they are laden with comparisons to life in England which, while easy to comprehend, do not fully capture the complexities of Japanese customs. Often they are made while the author recalls tales of trips with expat friends. His time spent exploring with other foreigners is potentially the least interesting aspect of the book - but takes up a lot of the story.

It's at its best when he speaks candidly with locals, be it in a family home or in a local bar, but these seem to take second place to the authors personal trials and issues wrestling with a foreign land. A certain naivety in the experiences is both refreshingly honest and occasionally limiting. More of a focus on rural Japan would have made a more compelling story. In the end we have a book which is anecdotal, engaging and truthful but ultimately lacking in depth. Those looking to get a solid insight into Japanese culture may be disappointed, but as a foreigner's buoyant first leap into Japan - it works reasonable well. Certainly worth a read.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 November 2013
I must admit i liked this. I am applying for The JET programme myself (man the form killed me!) so this was a welcome read. There is not so much about the job of teaching per se in it but overall I enjoyed the read. It read fast and was written in a friendly and warm style. I am now reading My Mother is a Tractor also about JET, which has more references to teaching in and is funnier read but I would recommend this book.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 April 2014
Not bad for a first book, but did not deal with his time in Japan in any depth, skating over the experiences far too lightly.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)