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4.5 out of 5 stars
1,124
4.5 out of 5 stars
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on 22 August 2016
The Thread follows the lives of several characters in Thessaloniki from 1917 to around 1962. The characters live through famines, wars and displacement. The bonds between them are strong and touching - a book where sometimes the strongest connections are the community rather than blood relatives. Their culture is a central theme, as is politics.

We have Katerina: taken in by Eugenia and brought up with Eugenia's twin daughters. Their neighbours, the Morenos, have a tailor business and Katerina develops a love of and talent for sewing. Also living in the neighbourhood is Dimitri and his mother Olga - they are part of the wealthy elite but are living temporarily in a relatively poor area while their house is rebuilt. Dimitri's socialist / Communist values, heavily influenced by his childhood experiences, are deeply conflicting with those of his father who is sympathetic to the ruling elite.

The love story between Katerina and Dimitri is an important part of the story, as is the experiences of the Moreno family as Jews in WWII and the family conflict between Dimitri, his oppressed but sympathetic mother and his capitalist father.

While it was a lovely story, I was not swept up in it (unlike Victoria Hislop's "The Island") and at times I was plodding through it. A good read rather than a great one, but still very enjoyable.
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on 29 January 2014
I bought this book after being acquainted with The Island and enjoyed losing myself in the stories of the characters, however I felt the book was biased towards the Leftists and excusing their impact on my country making it seem that they only wanted the good of the homeland and underplaying the paidomazoma - the abduction of Greek children which were sent to Communist bloc countries to be indoctrinated. I would have preferred if the author had spent a little more time researching the history of Modern Greece. I was also expecting some kind of redemption for Konstantinos but it never came. He was only there to be the baddie and provide a reason for his son's actions. If you are reading this book as an outsider who is totally unaware of Greek history, then it won't bother you, but please do not take the fiction as fact. If you really want to know about the guerillas and their actions, read Eleni, by Nicholas Gage.
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on 11 July 2017
This book is the most emotional and touching fictional book I've read cos it is ruted in history, entirely relatable and its beautiful, heart braking story is a true joy to read. I laughter, shouted and cried.I also shared the joy, the fear, heartbreak of the city and its characters. Brilliant read!
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on 24 August 2017
Wife and I read this to each other on holiday in Greece. It captured the mood entirely... love Victoria Hislop.... is she a "woman's writer" ? - I don't care.. anything she does is brilliant.
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on 28 July 2017
Arrived on time and exactly as required.
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on 1 August 2017
Currently reading, I know I am going to enjoy this novel!
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on 3 September 2017
Enjoyed Victoria's books yet again
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on 18 July 2017
interesting if a little drawn out
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on 1 May 2017
Love her books great stories
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on 7 May 2017
Gripping, touching, informative. Love Victoria!s books. Her writing brings history alive and answered some of the questions I asked of Turkish friends.
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