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4.3 out of 5 stars
47
4.3 out of 5 stars
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on 8 May 2017
Super read, well up to Jack Higgins usual standard. Confirmation that he has a wider range than Just Sean Dillon.
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on 6 August 2017
ok
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on 26 February 2015
good book
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on 22 June 2015
This could never happen, but when Jack Higgins writes it you believe it
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on 6 June 2001
Jack Higgins does an exemplary job in creating rich characters, suspensful plot, and a suprising ending. Harry and Max Kelso become real to the reader, and it is heartbreaking to realize that as a reader of a novel, there is nothing one can do to aid the twins in their perils. This is an excellent read, and it becomes impossible to stop reading. As a student, it is difficult for me to find time for things such as recreational reading, but I just had to make time to finish this one! Thank you, Mr. Higgins, for this incredibly captivating and touching story! I recommend this book to everyone!
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on 8 July 2003
Without a doubt this is the best book that I have read alll year. I have read many books similar to this but this book all of the gripping. Mr Higgins however took it to a new level. You can't help but love the heroes of the book. It is a book that takes about one chapter to grip you however once your into it your hooked. I ended up reading it in two days when books usually take me a couple of weeks to read. Thankyou for this wonderful creation Mr Higgins.
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on 13 September 2011
Two twin brothers, Max and Harry find themselves on opposite sides in the second world war.

Born to an American father and German mother loyalities are divided when the father is killed and the boys mother decides to head back to her native Germany to claim her heritage.

Max being the oldest by ten minutes becomes a Baron, while Harry stays with him grandfather, soon to be a senator. Both boys decide to follow in their fathers footsteps and become fighter pilots. At the break of war they both join the RAF and Luftwaffe respectively and soon become Ace's and work their way through the rankings.

At the heart of the tale is a stuffed bear called Tarquin, carried by their father as Macsot on every flight and handed down to Harry who does the same.

At the start of the novel, set in 1997, the bear is once again airborne and survives a crash into the channel. The lifeboat coxswain (now 85) picks up the survivors and recognises the bear and memorys come flooding back. With a little digging around the full tale is told.

This book is wriiten in very much the same style as The Eagle has landed. As usual, Higgins makes the pages fly by. I have read other reviews where historical inaccuracies have been made apparent, but unless your a total History geek, you won't even notice these.
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on 29 September 1999
This isn't one of Higgins better books. The characters are pretty one dimensional some of the dialogue is pretty cliched. There are some glaring factual errors which detract from the story - Germany could not have given the Finns the FW-190 in 1939/40 the 1st prototype didn't fly until June 1939 and the 2nd not until October '39 and it didn't enter production until late 1940. The plot also reuses familiar threads from other Higgins stories - the note from Himmler instructing readers to help the bearer, and when it all goes pear shaped Hartmann telling his secretary to get away bears quite a similarity to the Eagle has Landed. I read it completely - if you haven't don't bother.
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on 11 October 2014
This is a somewhat average story of two twins caught on either side of World War 2. As a gimmick it is fine but it doesn't create the sort of drama it should have. It is neither a detailed story around a particular aspect of the war nor a sweeping grand overview where two people make a difference. There is a lot of duplication and moving here and there without too much excitement. Having said that the atmosphere does grip after a while even through the simple narratives and there is value in seeing what happens in the end.
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on 2 June 2000
I read this the day after reading "Night of the Fox" which I cannot praise highly enough. However, this book had a lot of similarities and yet was not nearly as good; the character development didn't seem to work for me, it seemed a list of things they did and the medals the brothers received, and the 'true history' angle left me confused - is it real history? He writes as if it is, but I suspect not. My advice is don't buy this one, buy Night of the Fox.
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