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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
15
4.1 out of 5 stars
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£1.80


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on 9 June 2016
Some good ideas and easy to follow. This is more advanced and takes a bit more practice
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on 13 August 2012
Bought How to Draw Cartoons for my daughter who is 13 years old; she is an avid drawer. She wanted some pointers for drawing cartoon images and this book has helped her immensely. It's not the sort of book you would read one day and forget about; my daughter regularly revists How To Draw Cartoons for tips and guidance. Peter Maddocks has created a very versatile and easy-to-follow 'How to' book for all ages. Great book 5 stars!
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on 17 March 2015
I had this book as a child so was delighted to see its been republished. I ordered it for my daughter and just received it. I can't believe how poorly reproduced it was! The original book has been photocopied and binded together as a slightly thicker magazine! The wording isn't as bold as its a photocopied copy.
And not worth the price! Really really disappointed.
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on 15 August 2013
The perfect book for beginners and those who already draw their own cartoons. Simple instructions and sound professional advice on structure / format
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on 20 March 2013
This book really helped me with my drawing, and I would highly recommend it to anyone else who needs help drawing cartoons.
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on 7 January 2014
A great book which is crammed full of examples to get you started. It's not really a step by step book to drawing, but the illustrations it contains are so clear, it really doesn't matter. If you're of a certain age, you'll instantly recognise the style of drawings (I used to be a big fan of The Family Ness when I was a kid, and these drawings brought back fond memories!) A good fun read too. Highly recommended.
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on 15 March 2003
"How To Draw Cartoons" is very much aimed at those who are interested in learning the trade, but have no idea where to start. Like many, I was attracted to Maddocks' bold, sweeping artwork and humorous text accompaniment. He begins the book by showing us how to draw a simple cartoon face - making small alterations to change the gender. We are then encouraged to practise the drawing of numerous expressions; the basic happy and sad to the all-out wacky and exaggerated nature of shock and rage manifestation. Maddocks must be commended for persuading the reader to develop his or her individual style rather than simply copying his. He not only explores areas of cartooning such as mood and bodywork, but also the detail involved in creating hands and feet. Several pages, for example, are dedicated to the detail involved in what hands can say about a character in terms of movement and shape. Another section of the book focuses on stereotyping and period costume. Maddocks shows us how to make a reporter appear nosey, a cabbie cheeky and a policeman authoritive. Angles are also covered in detail - illustrating the importance of perspective and unusual viewpoints to emphasise certain features of the cartoon.
If like me, you have difficulty in finding ideas for your cartoons, the author is happy to provide some - albeit brief - answers. From simple things like carrying a pencil and notebook with you for when inspiration strikes, to things you may not have thought of, like using famous people, history and even cookery to trigger you brain cells. If you're a fan of Maddocks, you'll be pleased to discover that he uses many of his own previously published cartoons to fill the gaps; Penny Crayon, Dogsbody and The Cop Shop are some of my personal favourites. He also gives the reader an insight into his life as a cartoonist - sharing some of the difficulties he's had with topical cartoons and the great demand for them. If you're interested in selling your own cartoons to newspapers and magazines, there is a fleeting section covering the ins and outs of column sizes and the correct use of speech bubbles, which may well prove to be useful. Other topics of interest include the instruction of animal drawing, backgrounds and even the trivial combs, buckets, spade and children’s toys.
If you're looking for a lengthy insight into the world of the cartoonist or a step-by-step guide to having your own creations published, you're not likely to find it here. Maddocks is talented enough to pull off a book like this without having to use colour even once - his work stands out as being unique and is exceptionally easy on the eye. The text here is limited - and that's not necessarily a bad thing. The author clearly prefers to fill pages with what he believes to be more important - the illustrations, and I believe he is right. After following this course, my skills of cartooning increased greatly. Although you shouldn't expect a complete transformation overnight, in time, like me, should you work at your drawing you will get the results you are hoping for. Having been in the business for several decades to date, Maddocks is clearly one of the leaders in the field of cartooning and has many dedicated admirers. It is, however, very much a book aimed at beginners, and great fun, too.
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on 8 November 2012
A very good book for learning basics quickly and easily. Easy to follow. The main for me was showing how to draw the hands which is the most difficult part of a cartoon character.
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on 20 January 2015
Was given as a present to 8yr old. She loved it.
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on 19 October 2015
Just what I was looking for to get me started
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