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4.6 out of 5 stars
110
4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 17 April 2013
Brilliant film which gradually unfolds a complex plot, showing how inter-relationships affect a range of people, whether they like it or not
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on 27 December 2015
Really like this film.
really recommended , especially if you like to understand Iran.
it deserves the Oscar (It is Oscar winner)
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on 13 January 2014
A realistic portrayal of life in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Very moving, brought tears to my eyes. Very good acting and directing.
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on 20 February 2013
An excellent film, it came highly recommended. It did not fail to satisfy as it was indeed very illuminating. I would recomend!
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on 29 September 2015
Very powerful sensitive film about a family's tragic internal conflcts. The acting was superb all round.Highly recommended.
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on 29 December 2013
This is a fine example of a contemporary Iranian film so well directed and acted. Moving and very enjoyable, A1
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on 11 March 2012
'A Separation' is Asghar Farhadi's new film, a domestic drama about the break-up of a family. After many years of marriage, Simin (Leila Hatami) wants to divorce her husband Nader (Peyman Moaadi). They have an 11-year-old daughter Termeh (Sarina Farhadi), and Nader's father (Ali-Asghar Shahbazi) lives at their flat as he suffers from Alzheimer's and is in need of constant care.
Nader is unable to care for his father while he works, he hires Razieh (Sareh Bayat), to look after him. Due to her religious beliefs, Razieh is not allowed to work in a single man's household. But her husband Hojjat (Shahab Hosseini) has been unemployed for a long time and is threatened with jail by his creditors, so she has no choice but to work. Razieh has a young daughter and is also pregnant, and the lengthy early commute to work proves a physically stressful burden. When Nader comes home early one day to find his father left alone, tied to his bed and locked in his room, the resulting argument with Razieh sets off a chain of events with catastrophic consequences for everyone concerned. Everyones integrity and honesty are called into question, it seems everyone is on trial.
Director Farhadi creates as realistic a story a possible, an emotional, involving drama with no sentimentally. The direction is effortless and unflinching, the faultless acting keeps you emotionally connected to every scene. Each character has a naturalistic complexity rarely seen in film, the good and bad in these people become blurred because you cannot help but be compassionate towards all of them. You understand exactly why these people act in the way they do, you can see the mistakes they all make. You become so deeply involved yourself, repeatedly asking yourself 'where did it all go wrong?' and 'how would i have reacted?'.
You are confronted with issues of religion and modernity, marriage, gender, Iranian law, culture and class. As the story unravels, the second half of the film is carefully structured so that we re-confront events which we'd already seen, or thought we'd seen. We're obliged re-evaluate what we think we saw, making us aware that we too may have mentally erased or distorted some vital details through our own hypocrisies, just like the people in this story.
Once the final twist is exposed to you, issues of judgement, of right and wrong, seem ridiculous. Termeh becomes central to the story and becomes the moral beacon, Sarina Farhadi gives an incredible performance of real subtlety and depth. The final scene still lingers in my mind, where Termeh has to make a decision that she knows she has to live with for the rest of her life.
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on 2 October 2014
Excellent non mainstream film. I would recommend it to anyone who likes arthouse films.
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on 10 May 2013
very well acted but a rather grim film do not watch it if you feel down its more of a film buffs film
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on 3 June 2012
I loved this film. Separation and divorce is always sad and can often lead to irrational behaviour. The press often portray moslem divorce as being simple and as biased towards the man. This film shows two intelligent people`facing the problems of divorce in Iran. The separation is complicated by the husband's father suffering from alzheimers and his need of constant care. An alternative view of life and the courts in Iran is shown and it is interesting to see the sympathetic handling of a complicated family case.
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