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on 16 May 2016
Jonathan Sacks is always such good company that this book like his others is a pleasure to read whatever one's starting point. He has some wonderful insights, e.g. the Greeks being left-brained and the Jews right-brained, hence the contrasts between the two ancient cultures. He is also extremely well versed in old testament history and able to interpret it in a new and relevant way without doing violence to modern sensibilities or (seemingly) to the original text. I definitely recommend this to anyone with an interest in philosophy, religion and/or science.
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on 28 April 2014
The writer explains why he believes the Jewish people feel so alone in the world politically. He points out from history that they have always been a close knit community, living in foreign countries and yet they kept their identity. He quotes from scholars down through the ages as to why the Jews feel, "a people alone". He argues that now the Jews are in their own land they must change by interacting with other countries. He admits it will be a struggle but Israel must embrace the world as they have a lot to give to help the world overcome its many problems.
A well structured book with a timely message to all mankind.
A book well worth reading
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on 11 December 2015
A really interesting and thought-provoking book. I would like lots of people to read it to disabuse them of prejudice. A wonderful explanation of religion which should interest even those with no faith at all, as an academic exercise if nothing else. Highly recommend it.
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on 24 October 2013
I really enjoyed this book and found it gave me much food for thought. As someone with an interest in the dialogue between science and religion it was refreshing to read something which was not combative in the way many books on this topic are. Whatever your beliefs and whether you agree with all Sacks says or not, I think you will find it interesting to read his perspective on matters of faith and science.
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on 29 April 2013
At 78 I should soon find out whether Sacks or Dawkins is correct. This is much less strident than all the some what hysterical publications of Dawkins who seems to be almost desperate to convince himself.
Jack Miller
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on 31 October 2011
Recently, one of the top listed books taken to summer recess by MPs was "The God Delusion" by Richard Dawkins. I've read it, and it is challenging, but not particularly insightful in the way we should live!

From Proverbs 18:17 "In a lawsuit the first to speak seems right,
until someone comes forward and cross-examines."

The Great Partnership is a wonderful cross-examination of the `New Atheists' tirade. It is arguably one of the best presented so far from a religious perspective. I hope it reaches the reading lists of all, including MPs this coming summer. It deserves wide hearing and respect.

I'm a Christian, but have a high level of respect for the genuine integrity of the Chief Rabbi, Jonathan Sacks. Although I differ in many of his arguments, I believe that this book will go down as one of the strongest advocacies of `Abrahamic' religions ever produced in recent times.

Every thinking Christian should read it, sit up, and take notice. But more than that - respond with open arms of embrace, despite on-going disagreements or differences.

As the book is `one long argument' it would be perhaps unwise to extract a single paragraph to illustrate its content, but I can't resist it. So, for me, this is one to savour, taken from his Chapter 14 (page 285) Why God?
"The mutual hostility between religion and science is one of the curses of our age, and it is damaging to religion and science in equal measure. The Bible is not proto-science, pseudo-science or myth masquerading as science. It is interested in other questions entirely. Who are we? Why are we here? How then shall we live? It is to answer those questions, not scientific ones, that we seek to know the mind of God. But there is more to wisdom than science. It cannot tell us why we are here or how we should live. Science masquerading as religion is as unseemly as religion masquerading as science."

Jonathan Sacks is someone I would love to meet.
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on 30 September 2012
I have always been impressed by Jonathan Sack's attempts at moderating the extreme views expressed by both Science and Religion. He, quite rightly in my opinion, concerns himself about their vitriolic attacks that can be so dangerous. He would like to see a world where both sides are far more conciliatory which is a view I would subscribe to, so I found this book a welcome 'middle ground' read. Rabbi Sack's message is that both sides have a part to play in understanding our world and neither need to be threatened by the other. I'm not sure if this book would convince any of the hardliners on either side, but if you consider yourself a moderate in the Science verse Religion arena then I highly recommend this book.
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on 26 April 2013
My wife heard Jonathan Sacks on Andrew Marr's radio programme. She told me they were discussing this book and because she liked what the chief Rabbi had to say she thought I would be interested in it.
Jonathan sacks deals with some major subjects such as how the Universe was formed and is held together, how some societies use the left side of the brain and other the right side. He produces quotes from philosophers written thousands of years ago that would have uncanny application today. He talks about how our alphabet and left to right writing came about. The book is full of references to a great number of issues we struggle and/or enjoy almost daily. But above all this is a book about God, His love for us, how and why we can lead better lives, improve society and co-exist with science. This book will appeal to believers and non believers and to everyone who is interested in life and what it means.
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on 9 March 2013
I bought this book by the Chief Rabbi as recommended for Lenten reading y an Anglican Clergyman writing in the "Times". It is beautifully written in easy to read plain English. Clearly, much scholarship has gone into the writing, but you do not have to be a biblical scholar to enjoy and profit from reading it. I commend it without reservation.
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on 27 November 2014
The more of Rabbi Sacks writings I read the more I learn and the more I love his style, content and delivery. As a non Jewish reader this is an excellent read, which gives the reader one of the clearest views and descriptions of the Jewish people, where they came from, all that they have gone through and even where they are going in the future.

The title may put some people off reading this, thinking that it is a deeply philosophical and strongly scientific will find that the information is presented in a way that will leave those of without any theological, philosophical or scientific 3rd level education will find the method of delivery understandable and challenging.

Conversely those with a higher degree of study and education will not find themselves missing out, they will also find themselves being challenged on every level.

A surprisingly 'gripping' read, that I at least find difficult to put down.
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