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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 9 May 2007
Obviously, it is highly desirable to measure what matters and that is especially true of marketing initiatives. Here's the challenge which many (most?) readers will face after they finish reading this volume: Which metrics are the most appropriate for their specific organization? Co-authors Paul W. Farris, Neil T. Bendle, Phillip E. Pfeifer, and David J. Reibstein offer 50+ and in an ideal business world, every executive can - and will - master all of them. That is possible but highly unlikely. Fortunately, the authors offer a wealth of information and observations that can guide and inform the selection of those metrics that will enable executives to "gather and analyze basic market data, measure the core factors that drive their business models, analyze the profitability of individual customer accounts, and optimize resource allocation among increasingly fragmented media.

To the authors' substantial credit, they make effective use of a number of reader-friendly devices which enliven what would be an otherwise dull textbook and they do without compromising the integrity of research-driven insights which so many books on marketing lack. These devices include definitions, formulas, and brief descriptions of various metrics. They also include within individual chapters several sections, such as "Construction" (e.g. metrics issues concerning their formulation, application, interpretation, and strategic ramifications), "Data Sources, "Complications, and Cautions" (i.e. an analysis of the limitations of the metrics under consideration, and their potential inadequacies once executed), and "Related Metrics and Concepts" (briefly surveyed). This is by no means an "easy read" but will generously reward those who absorb and digest its material with appropriate rigor.

Although I believe this volume can be of substantial value to executives in almost all organizations (regardless of size or nature), I think it will be of greatest benefit to those - probably in larger companies -- who have an urgent need for accurate and consistent measurement of, for example, the dynamics behind their market share; the profitability of producing, pricing, selling, distributing, and servicing what they offer; and the ROI of marketing initiatives within the framework of enterprise financial metrics.

Those who share my high regard for this volume are urged to check out Enterprise Architecture As Strategy: Creating a Foundation for Business Execution by Jeanne W. Ross, Peter Weill, and David Robertson as well as Ram Charan's Know-How: The 8 Skills That Separate People Who Perform from Those Who Don't, Lynda Gratton's Hot Spots: Why Some Teams, Workplaces, and Organizations Buzz with Energy - And Others Don't, Robert J. Herbold's Seduced by Success: How the Best Companies Survive the 9 Traps of Winning, Jack Alexander's Performance Dashboards and Analysis for Value Creation, and Michael Useem's The Go Point: When It's Time to Decide--Knowing What to Do and When to Do It.
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on 10 January 2013
I actually bought it because I need it for my assignemt. The book is very easy to read, the explenations are very clear and there is usually an example for every metric so its easy to put into real case context how to apply a metric. Highly recommend it.
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on 9 February 2014
I am doing a marketing Masters degree and this will help me write all the assignments due. Add three words.
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