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Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
82
4.4 out of 5 stars


VINE VOICEon 29 December 2011
After Sophia's Secret and Mariana, I was looking forward to reading this book, but I thought it was a little undercooked. By that I mean there was a lot of potential which just didn't get developed into anything exciting in terms of plot or character. The Scottish hero is a bit too wooden. From the moment he comes striding across the moor towards the bus you know what's going to be happening with him and the heroine, archaeologist Verity Grey. The diversion of a snooty former boyfriend is quite frankly downright annoying at times. Some of the other characters are more interesting - the crinkly love story betweeen Peter Quinnell and Granny Nan is quite sweet.

I enjoyed the moments when the ghostly Roman Sentinel turns up, but the big climax in the storm was a bit disappointing for me. Fabia, the leggy blonde granddaughter is a bit irritating, too, as are a couple of the other secondary characters.

If you enjoy Roman history, you may like this, also if you know Eyemouth and that area, you will enjoy the descriptions of the place and the crowning of the Herring Queen and so forth.
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on 20 March 2017
Love this author, love this book
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Couldn't put this down fabulous !
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on 30 November 2014
Even altho it took over 3 weeks to come it was worth the wait Thank you
Jean
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 14 September 2012
Archaeologist Verity Grey is offered a job on a dig in Scotland where her eccentric boss believes he's found the graves of the legendary lost Ninth legion. Once there, however, Verity finds that the evidence is more than a bit questionable: faked photographs, a child with second sight, and the ghostly Roman Sentinel who cannot rest in his grave....

This is a light read which mixes a gentle romance with some mildly eerie goings-on. It reminded me of a lighter version of Barbara Erskine with its concern for the overlapping and interpenetration of past and present. It has a bit of a slow start but I was especially taken with the idea of being able to chat to the Roman sentinel in Latin (!), and found him a very poignant figure, still fulfilling his Roman duty of guarding the ground hundreds of years later.

So this is a very soothing, mellow and temperate read, nothing too scary, too dangerous, or too reckless is ever going to happen in this world - ideal before bed reading.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 24 May 2003
Beautifully written, the book immediately grips the reader in its thrall. The plot is well developed, as are the main characters. There are also enough twists and turns to satisfy most. If you enjoyed Susanna Kearsley's previous novel, "Mariana", you will also enjoy this one.
The plot revolves around an archaeological site in Scotland where our heroine, archaeologist Verity Grey, is working. Toss in a former lover, an eight year old blessed with second sight, a masterful, very attractive Scotsman, a family secret, some Scottish mists, and a ghostly sentinel from the Ninth Roman Legion, and you have a recipe for a gothic style page turner, if ever there were one.
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on 28 August 2016
Loved Sophia's secret and enjoyed this one nearly as much. The romance was bearable and the sentinel was awesome.
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on 27 December 2010
I read Marianna and thought that was quite a good read. My daughter bought me this for Christmas. I just couldn't really get into it, it is tame, a little boring and easy to put down. I kept on reading hoping something exciting was going to happen or it may 'liven up' a little, very disappointing.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 1 December 2002
Beautifully written, the book immediately grips the reader in its
thrall. The plot is well developed, as are the main characters. There are also enought twists and turns to satisfy most. If you enjoyed Susanna Kearsley's previous novel, "Mariana", you will also enjoy this one.
The plot revolves around an archaeological site in Scotland where our heroine, archaeologist Verity Grey, is working. Toss in a former lover, an eight year old blessed with second sight, a masterful, very attractive Scotsman, a family secret, some Scottish mists, and a ghostly sentinel from the Ninth Roman Legion, and you have a recipe for a gothic style page turner, if ever there were one.
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on 14 February 2010
Susanna, who wrote this book, is Canadian. She visited Eyemouth in the Scottish borders some yeas ago to research it. I live in the town and know the area quite well, also having authored two books that are about the place(s) and the people. Shadowy Horses lies in the 'romantic fiction' world, with a young lady looking for long term love; handsome young and older men and a touch of local 'colour', with a few Scots' words tucked in for 'authenticity'. It's an easy read, and flows along well, but it is also pretty superficial in its use of location. Eyemouth, if you accept the book's version is ringed by motorways (there are none); inhabited by ghosts (probably), and full of caring, soulful women and brawling, drunk fishermen practising 'free trade' (smuggling) - which is at best a part-truth.

I wouldn't have read the book if it hadn't been about the town and the area. Rosehill, the main setting for the archaeological 'dig' is based on Old Linthill. The likelihood of connections with the Roman Ninth are pretty dubious. My three stars is probably fair given that I'm not a fan of romance novels, primarily aimed at a female audience. For ghosts and ancient connections, Gordon Honeycombe and Alan Garner have written much more convincing novels, linking strands of the past and present.
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