Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Now

Customer reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
134
3.7 out of 5 stars
The Princes In The Tower
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£2.99


on 6 February 2017
Not a bad narrative of Richard III's short reign, with a reasonable analysis of why he might have behaved as he did. But...

The impression I get reading this is that the aim was to confirm his guilt over the disappearance of the Princes. Motive is well considered as to why he might have done them harm, as part of the feud with the Wydville family and his own survival. But the evidence is too reliant on second hand sources, chiefly Sir Thomas More, who had evidence of a confession from a Knight who was allegedly involved on the night of the murders.

The problem with this is that evidence extracted under torture or threat invariably ends up being whatever the imprisoner wants it to be. Further, Richard III was not popular - he behaved as a despot and had a large number of nobles executed without trial within a very short timeframe. Once he was dead, anyone wanting to censure him could do so with impunity, and any looking to provide a counterpoint would either already be dead or unwilling to speak up. To make things even more complex, Henry VII, who eventually turned out to be no less despotic and paranoid, had a great many of the surviving gentry killed, imprisoned or effectively blackmailed during his own reign meaning that many of those who were present during the last days of the House of York never gave any testimony or account of what they saw. Effectively, the civil war and strife caused by rebellions and scheming continued well into Henry VIII's reign. It did not all end at Bosworth in 1485.

In the final reckoning, Richard probably did cause the Princes' death. In this, he was a man of his time, ruthless and brutal. His successor was equally unpleasant, but had a dynasty following him and his own crimes were carried out over many years. Richard III's deeds were all over a very short period and he died in battle, so history has been less forgiving.

So, overall not a bad narrative - but as with any consideration of history, please bear its context in mind and treat it carefully. Worth a read.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 August 2017
I bought this book because I was hoping to read more about the discovery of the Princes' bodies and discussions as to what had happened to them. But Alison Weir's book is about the story of Richard III's rise and his supposed murder of the Princes. It is a compilation mainly of the relevant sources and Weir makes little attempt to turn them into a readable story but she quotes extensively from them so the book ends up sounding like a fifteenth century piece of work. It is difficult to understand sometimes and if you are not familiar with this part of English history, the names will become confusing. Some of the sources she uses are questionable (she says so herself) but then uses them based on the assumption that the person had "no reason to lie." For me, that is not such a strong argument. But as it is difficult to prove what really happened, the use of these sources is better than nothing, which many fans of Richard III seem to do.

And the princes bodies are discussed in only a very brief chapter at the end. Nothing important in that respect is really said. Weir has it out for Richard III and her assumptions are not really very scientific. Although Richard III probably did murder his nephews and commit many of the other atrocities of his reign, Weir's assertions to the fact go far beyond what the historical record really indicate. It's not a great book. I would look elsewhere if you are looking to read about this interesting moment in English history.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 October 2014
This book arrived in good condition and print was easy to read. I read Alison Weir as she always has
interesting theories to put forward. I did not always agree with the decisions she arrived at as historical fact and in my opinion Richard III was innocent of the crime of killing the princes. I have theories of my own and agree largely with the revisionists thinking. Having said that, I would recommend this book as it is well written and offers historical facts as well as her own defining opinions.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 May 2017
An amazing, exciting book full of new theories about the fate of the Princes of the Tower. Alison Weir at her best.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 March 2017
A really first class book by a top author
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 June 2013
I was not impressed by the approach to this book. I have never been a total convert to the revisionist. But this book seems to have begun with her conclusion. Not as informative as previous books on Eleanor, Isabella and Elizabeth.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 August 2017
Didn't enjoy the rambling story
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 March 2017
Thanks
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 April 2015
The Princes in the Tower and Richard III. Bought as a second hand book for the cost of 1p!! The book does seem very biased against King Dick, but until further evidence from the Richard III society and the dna samples of the bones located under the stairs of the Tower of London are fully tested we still dont know who killed them, or if they were killed at all. Good read though, and very quick delivery 5 stars for that.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 May 2014
I've never got to grips with the fact that Richard is supposed to have had his nephews murdered, and I still can't. This is a good book, and the facts are compelling, but I still feel that there's a lot more to the story than we know about. No doubt the absolute truth will never be known now........
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)