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4.1 out of 5 stars
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4.1 out of 5 stars
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I must admit that it has been a few years since I last read any of F Scott Fitzgerald’s works, so it made a pleasant change to re-read this book. This particular novel was the last complete one that was published by Fitzgerald in his lifetime. In some ways this book is semi-autobiographical, that is if you look at what was happening in the Fitzgerald’s lives at around the time that this was first thought of and writing started.

To most people The Great Gatsby is considered to be Fitzgerald’s masterpiece; however he himself considered this book to be, although it was met with some very mixed reactions by the reading public at the time. It has to be admitted though that as the yeas have gone by this book has met with a greater appreciation and enjoyment by later generations.

Set in the Twenties we first meet Dick and Nicole Diver in a small relatively out of the place resort on the Riviera, a few miles from Cannes. As new film star Rosemary Hoyt and her mother come to the nearest hotel for a break so Rosemary comes across the Divers, and takes an instant liking to Dick. As we follow this episode we see that she starts to become aware of something perhaps a little strange in the Diver marriage.

Quite complex in its structure, and taking in how Dick and Nicole came together this has a lot to offer readers. If you take away the Jazz Age and the wealth of the characters here, then the issues raised are still as relevant today as when this was first written. We have mental illness, child sex abuse, extra-marital relationships, keeping up appearances and people behaving badly abroad, all of which still goes on, and other subjects raised.

With some really well fleshed out characters we also see how Dick Diver, who should be the most stable character here slowly becomes worn down, more introspective and turning to alcohol. The two leading ladies in this book, Nicole and Rosemary become much stronger and self confident as the story goes on, becoming more the type of modern woman that we are familiar with today. An ideal book to read any time, this also gives you more than enough to contemplate and discuss within a book group setting.
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on 17 January 2013
This edition is F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1934 original novel. There is a cheaper edition, but I noticed reviews saying it had spelling and punctuation mistakes, and even missing text. So I was glad I bought this edition which is free from errors and well laid out. There are contemporary photographs between chapters which are unique to this version as well.

If you haven't read Tender is the Night before, it's a longer and more challenging work than The Great Gatsby, more ambitious and more rewarding in my mind. You can see the influence of Sigmund Freud and notions of madness. I would recommend you Google 'Hemingway's Letter to F Scott Fitzgerald' to see what another great writer thought about this classic book.
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on 10 April 2013
A very well presented edition of the classic novel, with some great photos. The price makes it all the more tempting.
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on 22 October 2012
This isn't a review of the novel (which is brilliant) but of this kindle edition which is atrocious. It would be nice perhaps if the kindle editions were actually read through prior to issuing as this one contains numerous spelling mistakes, weird punctuation and, worst of all, missing words and sentences. It starts out OK but gradually gets worse and I gave up about 25% in as there was one point where I really struggled to understand what was happening due to the quantity of missing sentences. I'm still in the half kindle / half proper books camp, but in this instance buy the physical item and enjoy what is a genuine classic as it should be enjoyed.
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on 9 June 2016
very good. Moving evocation of the prewar era.
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I must admit that it has been a few years since I last read any of F Scott Fitzgerald’s works, so it made a pleasant change to re-read this book. This particular novel was the last complete one that was published by Fitzgerald in his lifetime. In some ways this book is semi-autobiographical, that is if you look at what was happening in the Fitzgerald’s lives at around the time that this was first thought of and writing started.

To most people The Great Gatsby is considered to be Fitzgerald’s masterpiece; however he himself considered this book to be, although it was met with some very mixed reactions by the reading public at the time. It has to be admitted though that as the yeas have gone by this book has met with a greater appreciation and enjoyment by later generations.

Set in the Twenties we first meet Dick and Nicole Diver in a small relatively out of the place resort on the Riviera, a few miles from Cannes. As new film star Rosemary Hoyt and her mother come to the nearest hotel for a break so Rosemary comes across the Divers, and takes an instant liking to Dick. As we follow this episode we see that she starts to become aware of something perhaps a little strange in the Diver marriage.

Quite complex in its structure, and taking in how Dick and Nicole came together this has a lot to offer readers. If you take away the Jazz Age and the wealth of the characters here, then the issues raised are still as relevant today as when this was first written. We have mental illness, child sex abuse, extra-marital relationships, keeping up appearances and people behaving badly abroad, all of which still goes on, and other subjects raised.

With some really well fleshed out characters we also see how Dick Diver, who should be the most stable character here slowly becomes worn down, more introspective and turning to alcohol. The two leading ladies in this book, Nicole and Rosemary become much stronger and self confident as the story goes on, becoming more the type of modern woman that we are familiar with today. An ideal book to read any time, this also gives you more than enough to contemplate and discuss within a book group setting.
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on 31 October 2016
excellent, would recommend
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 8 April 2017
In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night, his hero’s fall from grace is more desultory decline than dramatic drop. But the clue is right there from the start with his name, Dick Diver.

The story starts in the 1920s on the newly fashionable French Riviera. Told in three parts, the first sees Diver’s seemingly perfect life with beautiful but brittle wife Nicole whom he loves. Onto the beach and into his life walks lovely 17-year old Hollywood ingénue Rosemary Hoyt; the attraction is mutual. The movie that has catapulted her to stardom is called Daddy’s Girl. The irony of this title later becomes clear.

The second part goes back to how Dick and his wife first meet - he a respected practitioner in the up-and-coming field of psychiatry, she a patient - and reveals Nicole’s shocking history. In the final part, Dick Diver allows his work, his wife, his social acceptability and his own innate likeability to go adrift as his alcohol consumption increases.

This is F. Scott Fitzgerald’s last and, arguably, greatest book. He was a man who knew a thing or two about alcohol and brittle wives himself. And though in later years he re-worked this haunting novel, I believe that the original sequence – with use of flashback rather than chronological order – must be the stronger. Seen through 20th century eyes, this book must have been a quite a phenomenon; through 21st century eyes, it still has the power to shock and dismay.
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on 20 November 2016
Loved it
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on 27 March 2017
Excellent. One of his best.
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