Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more

NEDS [Blu-ray]
Format: Blu-ray|Change
Price:£4.75+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 26 April 2017
Not too bad
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 23 December 2017
Lush
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 1 January 2018
Brilliant film but challenging
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 28 March 2017
Item arrived damaged but got a replacement no problem thank you
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 17 May 2016
brilliant film, enjoyed and appreciated by myself and my 15 year old daughter , highlights the barriers to learning and the social inequalities that society observes and maintains, violent and graphic in some scenes but nothing less than what is seen and experienced by many young people . A must for teachers and educators to watch .
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 14 December 2012
was sorry i bought this as its not what i expected a bit slow and very drab type of film
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 15 June 2011
NEDS or Non Educated Delinquents (which is a bacronym) - is a Film 4 production from Peter Mullan (writer, director and actor). He was responsible for the excellent `Magdalene Sisters'. This is set in early 1970's Glasgow and focuses on John McGill, who is doing rather well at school despite his dysfunctional home life. His mother is a bag of nerves and in denial about her rubbish life, his father is a drunken bully and his older brother is a Ned. He then starts Secondary school and soon realises that survival needs more than just studying.

His brothers' reputation leads other gang bullies to accept him as one of them and the pupil soon becomes the teacher. This is an excellently observed piece of film making. I could relate to so much of it, the fact that he would watch `Robinson Crusoe' (French black and white serial that the BBC would show in the summer holidays) with the curtains drawn, teachers smoking and the corporeal punishment from those same teachers. And the sound track is spot on with the likes of `The Sweet' and `Wizard' to name but two.

The acting is superb, but a word on the accents, they are broad Glaswegian, and may prove a bit hard to understand in places, Mullan has gone for authenticity over clarity if you get my meaning, and fair play to him for that. He actually used real Neds; one had to be let out of remand to finish it.

He has been criticised for stereotyping working class people as drunken thugs or bullies, but I grew up in a situation which mirrored a lot of what took place here and for me it had a lot of resonance and therefore came across as very real and very believable.

It is not a short film at 124 minutes but it does fly by. There are frequent scenes of violence and very strong language throughout, but that is the reality of how it was and in some places still is, only the police are not quite as rubbish as portrayed here. It is not primarily about gang culture, but more a study in nurture over nature, and living in a very macho centric world. I gave it five stars as I loved it and hope you will too; I look forward to the next offering from Mr Mullan.
0Comment| 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 24 September 2012
Firstly, I didn't find 'Neds' even remotely as brilliant as 'Trainspotting' or 'This Is England' (both titles are far more superior). However, it's one to look out for in you enjoy gritty British films, even if it does rarely rise above average.

Set in the early 1970s, it's the story of a young man called John McGill (brilliantly played Conor McCarron) from Glasgow who goes through the journey (albeit quickly, there isn't much time for character development) of starting out as a prize winning schoolboy to a knife carrying teenager. The film goes onto become very violent as John carries on with a life of self destruction. It's hardly an original storyline, but the movie is well written and a real hard-hitting effort. It also seems to be a pretty realistic portrayal of life in the area at the time and the performance from McCarron is faultless.

'Neds' is far from a British classic but is nevertheless worth watching.

The DVD contains deleted scenes.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 8 April 2012
Growing up in a housing scheme in Glasgow during this period made the film seem very real and similar to what it was like. Many good people lived in these areas, so this is only really a partial snapshot, however it was easy to be drawn into a life that offered little chance of escape. The portrayal of the teaching profession at that time is spot on and some of the dialogue is very humorous.
0Comment| 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 24 May 2011
Boy there is a positive glut of these atypical rite of passage,"gritty" film 4 lottery funded films.You know the sort poor kid,alcoholic father,family becomes a violent feral gang,kid grows up poetically off the tracks,scenes of yob carnage coupled with a banging 70s soundtrack.I yawn.I watched this because of the hyperbole,critics frothing at the mouth with lavish praise.I wish these critics would stop their shenanigans.Well the film for the first half pretty much follows the gritty social realism template we all are bored of albeit with indecipherable scottish talk.Frankly i was going to turn the movie off with all the stifled dinnertimes,ruffled teachers etc but held on.The 2nd half is definetly better adding a more surreal style to the kitchen sink,a more abstract approach which was original and worked.I believe the actor who played the lead far more affective in this segment whereas in the first half he was way too vacant,it was impossible to care or identify with him.The director Peter Mullan gives an interview in the extras and comes across as a cool,bs free guy and is refreshingly articulate.Those expecting a This Is England ride i would advise caution,its an ok film with some nice touches but NOT the masterpiece the cover screams at you.Someone desperately needs to revitalise this genre and move it away from estates and the inherent romanticism,the only example that springs to mind is Clockwork Orange.And that was a long time ago.I am tired of working class people being presented as alcoholics,unfit parents or violent pyschopathic football hooligans.
33 Comments| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse


Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)