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on 14 December 2012
... and the Far Eastern Asian mind is beautiful in the way it works in apprehending the world and relating with each other. I discovered I had several Asian/Chinese traits in my own way of thinking and understanding things, perhaps because I am Brazilian.

On the Brazilian note, the book works on the bulk of research applied to North Americans and Europeans and although it mentions Latin Americans (with very good precision), the Western mind in discussion here is mainly North American and European. This doesn't mean the book will not be useful for everyone else, this book reveals a lot about mental processes which will be useful for oneself to improve their own and understand our Asian overlords, to whom I would like to welcome :).

Another thing to take into consideration is that this book is not written as Freakonomics, in the sense that information is masticated and de-jargonised for a wide audience. The focus on the book is cognition and a little read or previous knowledge of that topic might be required to enjoy the book even more.

My advice to Richard Nesbitt is to work on a version of his book that is even easier to digest as I believe the West needs more books that brave through the prejudice and fear of the unknown.
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on 15 February 2013
I've always been fascinated with Eastern culture, and since I plan to move to China, I thought this book a Malaysian friend recommended would help me understand my future peers.
There is no effort to justify stereotypes of Easterners or Westerners, thankfully. The evidential results the book mention are broad in nature, and the author insists these findings should be taken with a culturally-sensitive pinch of salt.
It could just be me, but the constant referencing of very similar experiments every second page can get a bit repetitive and tedious. Apart from that, it was an enlightening read.
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Very good
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on 2 February 2017
This book really opened my mind about different cultural backgrounds and how this can affect how we as people understand each-other. Helps to be more openminded when encountering issues.
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on 15 November 2017
My husband has loved this book and found it very useful when dealing with Easterners.
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on 18 July 2014
Necessary for knowhow!
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on 25 November 2014
Love it - amazing book amazing writer and really great experience, especially for someone who is Snologist!
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on 18 October 2015
Some of the conclusions are just too general to be plausible but certainly gives food for thought - and worth reading for anyone working with adults or children from diverse cultures - even if our differences are actually more individual than this book beleives they are, just the descriptions of the different perspectives are worth consideration.
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on 16 August 2013
I picked up this book because I am about to do a substantial amount of business in China. While I found some of the insights useful, I thought the book focused too much on comparative history and drew some abstract conclusions.

I will also add that the book still reflected a "western view" of the world, and portrayed western culture as superior. (i.e. I don't think the book is as unbiased as it proclaims to be)
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on 23 December 2005
Are there basic differences in thought processes between the Chinese-Confucian societies of East Asia and Western societies? The author answers "yes" and makes a compelling case.
Nisbett's thesis is that there is no universal human cognition - all cognition is culturally affected. Through the use of numerous psychological studies he shows a stark difference in the way Westerners and East Asians perceive, reason, and "see" the world. Nisbett begins by tracing the origins of Western and East Asian philosophy, science and society. On this foundation he builds a case that Western and East Asian cognition is very different. He completes the book with two chapters on the implications of such differences to our modern world.
After 15 years living and working in 3 countries in Asia I can say that there are fundamental differences in the way people from different cultures process, evaluate, and act on information. Everyone views the world through cultural "glasses," and the glasses are all different. Being aware of your own glasses and the glasses of others is a beginning to cross-cultural understanding.
My Japanese colleague has stopped trying to explain to Americans the way Japanese people think - now he just lets Nisbett's book do it. This book provides important research foundations for trainers and coaches who work cross-culturally in Asia.
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