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on 19 March 2015
Fascinating, very interesting and well thought out. A convincing argument which stands up to Military theory.
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VINE VOICEon 20 May 2014
Nicely written and produced, with some passionate arguments put forward - but the author tends to fit his thoughts to the facts, not the other way round, which makes it difficult to take any of his ideas seriously.

What a pity Mr Austin didn't try to show that the Norman army camped in the area he has proposed as opposed to fighting there - that would have made for a far more interesting and plausible presentation.
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on 16 December 2015
I don't normally write product reviews but I feel as an archaeologist who studies Battlefield Archaeology that I have to speak up about this book and it's ludicrous ideas. I grew up in Sussex, I have visited the battlefield on a number of occasion and I have spent a lot of time in Crowhurst- since studying at University I have learned to look critically at sources and understand their meaning. I had to purchase this book in order to critically analyse the "evidence" it puts forward as part of the debate that exists around the Battle of Hastings location, but trust me it wasn't a purchase I made willingly. This book is nothing short of fiction. Yes Austin makes a point that there has been no significant archaeological find at the established battlefield, but if he bothered to read the wealth of literature related to battlefield archaeology he would realise that battlefields are not as easy to define and the artefacts are often complex and difficult to identify. There are hundreds of missing battlefields, not just in the UK but across the world, and it is because they need a specialist methodology and skill to look for them. Look at the discoveries of Bosworth and Towton, the majority of the work which has given us more definitive answers has been done in recent years. This book comprehensively fails to understand battlefield archaeology as a discipline and archaeology in general. The established location of the battlefield is based on a wealth of academic evidence, and the archaeology of the original footings of the Norman Abbey at Battle, which location is not in fact totally fit for purpose, why would they make their lives harder if they had not other choice and where constrained by another reason.
As for Austin's "evidence" well I am speechless. By all means question historical documents but do not try and make a point out of something that isn't really there. There is a reason this theory has not been adopted by the archaeological community in the last couple of decades it is because there is nothing there to adopt- he says the account we have is fictitious..... I feel the only fiction piece here is this book.
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on 4 November 2012
As I live in the area Nick Austin suggests the Norman fleet landed in 1066, I am inclined towards his theory. Like him, I am not a historian, but logic probably would not support the traditional view of events. This book deserves wider reading and is worth reading too!
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on 16 August 2012
Having moved to Hastings two years ago, I have developed a great interest in the history of the area. Years previously I had heard a rumour that the Battle site cannot possibly be the original site of the Battle of Hastings - and recently, by luck, I stumbled across this book on my Kindle. I read it in two days - it is such an absorbing book and obviously written with such a passion. In it Nick present perfectly plausible reasons why the Battle could not have taken place at the traditional site, and he also puts forward strong arguements for his proposals of the actual sites of both the landing and the Battle. He also leaves the reader wanting more since he hints at the final resting place of King Harold. In short, a brilliant read, passionately written and thoroughly absorbing. If I could've rated it ten stars, I would have.
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on 20 September 2013
I have always been fascinated by 1066 and found Nick Austin's book explanation of the battle and the wasting of the area around Hastings very informative so that his theory that the battle actually took place at Crowhurst was quite believable. Maybe one day the theory may be proved.
A very good and interesting read.
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on 20 April 2012
For any poor soul who has trudged around the supposed battle site at Hastings after having first been advised that no, repeat no archaeological finds have ever been found on the turf you are walking on, then become very suspicious when the topography very obviously does not fit descriptions of the battle and its surrounds, this book goes a long way towards providing some sense of explanation. The author has obviously spent many years in thorough research, consulting renowned 11th Century scholars for intellectual back up along the way, and for my mind makes a convincing case for English Heritage to seriously think twice about continuing to claim that their managed site at Hastings is the genuine area where Norman and Saxon came to blows. I would appeal to the reader not to be put off by what at first may seem a some what dry academic work, as this book holds gems of research that hold more historical significance for the English people than most history books of the modern age. Buy it and you will not be disappointed.
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on 23 February 2013
I loved this book. It is a bit detailed and as I don't know the area I couldn't visualise evrything. However, I found it fascinating and a fabulous read.
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on 8 January 2013
Many visitors like me are underwhelmed by Battle Abbey. One expects an epic battlefield on a grand scale with a big hill up which Norman knight's struggled. You get something instead that is a bit naff and totally non challenging as to elevation. Then you learn that there are no battlefield finds here.

So first Bradbury and now Grehan and Austin are writing to dispute Battle Abbey as the site of the Battle of Hastings. They are assisted by Prof. Searle who has shown fraud within the Battle Abbey Chronicle.

Not all agree on where should now be recognised as the real battle site. But Austin makes an utterly compelling case for the landing site of the Norman invasion force to be at Coombe Haven. Ergo the battlefield should be within line of sight at Crowhurst.

Austin is on the whole meticulous about setting out his evidence, thinking and conclusions so that these may be either challenged or confirmed.

A must read for anyone interested in British history.
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on 14 December 2012
I have been following Nick Austins work for many years. I found his investigation to be incredibly compelling and brought real life to a historic event that although incredibly important to our history has to date been portrayed rather dismissively and with poor supporting evidence. Nick is an amateur in this field, but his incredibly thorough investigation has frankly put our professional historians and archaeologists to shame. This book is a "must read" for anyone interested in this incredible battle.
4 people found this helpful
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