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on 4 March 2014
Neuroscience is only now confirming how advanced the buddhist are on the workings of the mind,
this book provides simple schematics and scientific explanation of how the mind works and how
to gain better mindfulness, its all about conciousness and being aware of our thoughts and ultimately over time
how it landscapes our minds, there is a lot of scientific parts early on in the book which might not mean anything to the lay audience however you can skate past these if you wish and still understand the main message.
great book, very itneresting read and if you like buddhism and the science behind it then this is the book for you
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on 15 December 2012
This book clearly outlines how the reader might achieve and maintain optimum brain/mind health and well-being, and describes key brain/mind dynamics which both support and hinder optimumim brain/mind functioning, e.g., the inner conflict between the pull towards stability and constancy on the one hand, and pull towards growth and change on the other. The author supports the material with clear examples throughout, and punctuates key passages and concepts with practical exercises. While the book is a useful resource I found the audio version more engaging as is enables the reader to relate to the material at a deeper level. For instance, I found that the audio version helped with applying the insights and practices while travelling (e.g., walking or driving). I also found Rick Hanson's Only One Thing a useful companion to Buddha's Brain as it is a purely practical book and develops key ideas contained in Buddha's Brain (e.g., taking in the good), although it makes better reading than listening. My minor criticsm with Buddha's Brain is the frequent reference to the author's life and life experience which I found a bit indulgent and self-promoting and somewhat jarring with the central theme of cultivating non-attachment and humility.
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on 16 June 2017
This is a great book! Very accessible. Straightforward. Inspiring. Unites Buddhist secular philosophy with neuroscience in a way that avoids jargon and facilitates many "ah-ha!" moments. Dovetails deliciously with Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, mindfulness and Existentialism.
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on 3 March 2013
I found this book really interesting and helpful. It uses neuroscience to explain why we do the things we do and why many Buddhist practices are helpful in coping with life's difficulties. It is an inspiring read and I have found it helpful in both my personal and professional life.
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on 9 June 2017
The book started brilliantly and provide a clear comprehensive account of how the brain functions however as time went on I got slightly bored. Nothing stood out for me. There were a couple of points that I found interesting but for me it was very basic.
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on 22 April 2017
I love this book. So easy to read yet the writers explore the subject matter deeply and give us so many beautiful exercises and meditations to practice.
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on 28 March 2012
I feel this is an excellent book which I really enjoyed reading and will keep returning to. I found it thought provoking and it led to more than a few "ah-ha" moments. Buddhism is not my path (shamanism is) but i found it easy to read and very helpful in exploring and understanding my journey in life.
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on 25 June 2017
Brill
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on 5 June 2017
Great, wise book. All we need to know to start feeling better
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on 27 January 2013
I have a science background and I'm also practicing the Dharma. I thought this book draws on many research articles pertaining to neuroscience and was excellently written! This book will help one to understand how we cause ourselves 'secondary' dukka or unsatisfactoriness in our lives so that we can learn new ways of thinking, acting and being with our experience to help us become happier. It does not present quick fixes, but rather a re-orientation in how we can use Buddhist principles and practice in our daily lives coming from a standpoint, based in evidence of how our brains work.

I think it is a superb book!
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