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4.2 out of 5 stars
69
4.2 out of 5 stars
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on 18 March 2017
An excellent writer writing about some truly unbelievable things hidden away within UK society. Even if you disagree with his politics, his prose is excellent and makes for extremely engaging and entertaining reading
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on 4 August 2017
A superb read. Thank goodness that there are now books available which echo the feelings of that most underprivileged and unsung group of heroes, the indigenous British taxpayer, who, for decades, has had no voice, thanks to the vociferous liberal minority, which, for the past sixty years, has poured scorn on common sense opinion.
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on 25 March 2014
Dalrymple is a brilliantly accomplished essayist. His use of language is impeccably elegant and the subjects of his essays are of vital relevance to the times in which we live. His views of the major political and ideological controversies and problems of today are brilliantly analysed from the standpoint of someone who has had to deal, in his professional work, with the casualties and detritus of the modern welfare state, the massively expanding corporate state and the mendacious bien pensant philosophy which underpins the whole edifice.
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on 26 May 2017
Not as interesting as expected
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on 13 March 2014
For too many people - especially the intellectuals that support it - the welfare state is an abstract concept, encouraged for it's intentions and to instil a warm feeling of self-satisfaction. We have become so divorced from the reality of the welfare state that we fail to see the difference between intentions and outcomes.

Using first hand accounts, Dalrymple delves into a world most can barely imagine. As a doctor, working in many of the slums in the UK he has eye witness testimonial to how the welfare state not only fails to tackle poverty, but actively encourages destructive and squalid behaviour among the recipients. His elegant and dry writing style would make the stories comedic if they were not so tragic, and it leaves you with a newfound humility in the face of what we believe we can achieve through the institutions of state.

Do not be put off by the pen name 'Theodore Dalrymple', it chosen to be "suitably dyspeptic, that of a gouty old man looking out of the window of his London club, port in hand, lamenting the degenerating state of the world"!
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on 4 September 2015
Everything he writes is superb.
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on 11 April 2017
This was written when I was a teenager but a lot of it still rings true today. The blame is laid at the feet of leftie bourgeois intellectuals and their grandiose schemes to socially engineer a utopian society. The argument is always the same: the poor and oppressed have no agency and are helpless victims of circumstance. How depressing.
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on 17 November 2004
This is a fine book in which Theodore Dalrymple advances some common sense ideas about why the so-called "underclass" are the way they are. His time as a doctor in an inner city hospital has given him ample time to observe certain inalienable truths about the patterns of behaviour that lead to the chaotic and miserable lives lived by many in Britain today.

He argues that through a combination of bad parenting and poor education people are no longer taught to think for themselves and therefore have no comprehension of the ideas of personal responsibility, cause and effect or that their actions will have consequences. Sadly, through his daily interactions with the "underclass" Dr Dalrymple shows that many of those with whom he interacts tend to think things just happen to them rather than that, as is frequently the case, they are authors of their own misfortunes.

A damning indictment of 40 years of liberal-left social engineering that has led to this appalling state of affairs and betrayed a whole generation. Truly depressing reading.
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on 19 March 2013
This is one of a number of books by Dalyrimple, on the theme of the 'lower orders' and their management by lefties. The damage done, the serfdom and 'bovine ignorance' manufactured by the all-must-have-prize culture of 21st century Britain is illustrated in the pages of this book. . The author has wisely decamped to France. I don't get to see the 'lower orders' in the way the author did in his daily work, but is must be authentic for that reason only. Politically correct identity fascists (social workers, MP's and others), who administer to their victims should read this book.
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on 17 July 2016
One of the best books I have ever read. He is a master of the essay format. I have collected over a dozen of his books, but I feel this one is his very best, and is a treasure in my collection.
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