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VINE VOICEon 15 January 2014
When Mrs McGinty, the charwoman/housekeeper in a small village, is found dead the obvious suspect is her lodger James Bentley who is convicted and sentenced to hang. However Superintendent Spence is not convinced of his guilt and calls in Poirot to re-investigate; wise move!
Hercule Poirot duly visits the local residents and uncovers cupboards full of secrets in his search for the truth. It seems Mrs McGinty's snooping uncovered a dark and deadly secret, which proved fatal for her.
There's plenty of clues and mis-direction along the way as Poirot uncovers the truth in his usual inimitable style. The character of Ariadne Oliver also appears once more, an intriguing self-portrait of Agatha Christie herself. Unlike some, I found her humorous rather than grating. Poirot is such a great character, and here he is laid bare with his sharp and incisive mind and his vanity on display in equal measure.
A good story told in the no-nonsense Agatha Christie style.
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on 28 January 2016
My favourite of her books (and I'm a fan). Amusingly and colloquially written. I love the theme: what happens to the people in famous murder cases? This is presented through a "where are they now" in a tabloid of the day, with Poirot interviewing a jolly woman writer who looks incapable of turning out the sentimentality she lives by. Poor Poirot is lodging with one of the worst cooks he's ever met - in gratitude he teaches her how to make an omelette. Mrs Oliver turns up, throwing apples right and left. She's staying with a playwright who is butchering one of her novels for the stage. Poirot finds an unlikely helper in a rather vulgar girl who works for an estate agent and the post mistress thinks the worst. Is he "making certain suggestions"?
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on 6 June 2001
An innocent man accused of murder and it is up to Poirot to save him in this well-written story. The wool is pulled well over the reader's eyes and the end is a revelation. I got completely the wrong suspect. A good read, even if it does feature the infuriating Ariadne Oliver.
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on 13 June 2011
An elderly woman apparently murdered for few pounds ... her lodger accused for this crime and condemned to death..
However, the famous Christie's belgian detective Hercule Poirot realises that things may not be as simple as they first appear to be. Some photographs had appeared on a newspaper article: related with some old murder cases, they seems to have connection also with Mrs. McGinty's death. A different Poirot, who usually does not move from his armchair in London, solving cases only using his "little grey cells", but this time accepting to go to the little out-of-the-world village of Broadhinny, in a really odd guest house, suffering for the bad food and the even worst lodging, among crying children and bowls of spinach left on the sofa ... He realises to be on the right track towards the real murderer when he is almost pushed under a train..
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on 1 December 2010
I read this book a while ago now, so my recollection of the plot is a bit vague, but it centres around a housekeeper, or charlady, the eponymous Mrs Mcginty. From the outset, Christie presents a seemingly straightforward case of a murder, and a suspect in jail facing the death sentence on account of circumstantial evidence, but when the detective on the case expresses some doubts and enlists Hercule Poirot's help,there are revelations which could potentially overturn the decision, and it all begins with photographs. Christie, and her supersleuth Poirot, with guest appearance from good friend Ariadne Oliver(who I suspect is a character based on Christie herself)are on sparkling form in this sweet little mystery, which, as usual, keeps you going to the very end. A must for all Poirot fans!
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on 29 January 2012
This Poirot mystery has all the elements to make a perfect Agatha Christie: an idyllic village setting, a whole host of savoury and unsavoury suspects and the original murder not being what it seems. Clues are dropped throughout with a thoroughly satisfying conclusion, complete with a mini-twist at the end. The characters have just enough depth to keep the story going and like so many others provide a little glimpse of the period. There are also humourous elements as Poirot suffers at the hands of the well-meaning Mrs. Summerhayes. Ariadne Oliver's inclusion provides us with entertaining asides as well. This 50s mystery is Christie at the top of her game.
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on 18 August 2012
Overall that book was an excellent, late Poirot whodunit that exceeded my expectations. The story just flows so brilliantly that I finished the book in hours. Although the murderer revelation in the end is one I didn't guess (alas, that doesn't happen often with Christie's books!!), the story was less contrived and so easy to follow than most other Christie books I've read, and they're a few - so I recommend this book to the educated Christie / Poirot fans and the complete 'novice' alike as an excellent introduction to her fascinating world of crime novels!
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on 3 February 2013
Although this isn't my favourite Poirot, it is still good. A char-woman gets murdered and her lodger is sentenced to death for her murder. The leading detective has doubts and asks Poirot to investigate. He goes to a small village called Broadhinney where secrets are plentifull. Here Poirot investigates and finds what.... Read and find out. You will not be disappointed.

Nice easy read. Would recommend.
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on 20 June 2011
This is a very good story. The best bits were the imagined Poirot's expressions when describing his accommodation and the meals he had to endure. The man locked for the crime he didn't do is so unprepossessing that you feel he would probably be better off staying locked up forever. A very cleverly put together story. Only Christie could tell a yarn like this as far as I am concerned.
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on 28 September 2000
The book is a great read from begining to end and has a dark and sinister feel to it.Mrs Mcginty is killed and her shifty lodger is arrested but Poirot thinks he is innocent so he comes to stay in Broadhinny. The key to the crime seems to be past cases of murder as reported in The News of the World but murder comes to Broahinny in this sinister and incredibly ingenoius mystery.
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