Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Learn more Fitbit



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 2 August 2017
I am quite addicted to these books now as Frances Brody characters seem to leap out from the pages waiting for books 4 & 5 to come.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 September 2013
After reading the Stieg Larsson trilogy (which I thoroughly enjoyed) I decided to try something a bit more gentle. I discovered Frances Brody's first Kate Shackleton novel by chance while on holiday in Yorkshire and I found It easy to read and get involved with the characters right from the start. I then decided to try this second novel which didn't disappoint. If you like a simple murder mystery (Ilike TV's Morse and George Gently) then I think you will enjoy this book.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 January 2017
Loved this, cosy crime, well written - and a lovely plot - could lose myself in the whole set if time allowed.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 July 2017
Well written with well drawn characters.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 September 2014
Excellent I discovered this autor and I was very happy . The writing and the plot are excellent . The characters are well described and I could not stop reading.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 July 2017
Great
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 July 2017
Very good
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 July 2017
Well written, with a great storyline.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 October 2010
'Medal for Murder' is the second Kate Shackleton mystery by Frances Brody, eagerly awaited and highly enjoyable! Murder mysteries always elude me - watching the detectives is more my style - but the puzzle kept me engrossed, and I was surprised by certain twists and false clues.

Now a fully fledged private investigator, with an assistant and a cherrywood filing cabinet, Kate Shackleton is hired to investigate a robbery at a pawnbrokers in Leeds. A strange coincidence leads her investigation to Harrogate, where an eccentric theatre acquaintance is also staging her first production. After the play, Kate and her friend find the body of one of the sponsors in a doorway, and a starlet from the cast goes missing. Her grandfather, a veteran of the Boer war, is sent a ransom note, and asks Kate to help find her. Involved in three apparently separate cases, Kate's inquisitive nature is aroused, but the deeper she delves, the more secrets are uncovered.

I vastly prefer 'cosy' detective mysteries to the more hardcore police procedural series out there, and the Kate Shackleton books have the added bonus of being set in 1920s Yorkshire! Kate is a thoroughly modern lady of independent means, running a business with a former policeman as her assistant, driving her own car, and flirting with Scotland Yard detectives. Although Frances Brody keeps the post-WW1 era in mind, her brave and intelligent heroine is never held back in her determination to find the truth, and even uses her 'gentle sex' and genteel appearance to her advantage. The only time in this novel that I thought Kate was perhaps being rather too daring was the romantic development towards the end, but I suspect that relationship is going to continue with the series, so maybe Kate knows best after all!

I really enjoyed the South African backstory and the guided tour around Harrogate, which Frances Brody obviously researched well, and I didn't suspect the real murderer at all. My only gripe is that I had to wait so long for the sequel!
0Comment| 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Set in the early nineteen twenties, this is a fascinating story of a murder, a potential kidnapping and blackmail with theft thrown in as well. Kate Shackleton - private investigator - and her employee Jim Sykes, a former policeman are asked to contact a pawnbroker's clients for him after he suffers a robbery at his shop. This leads Kate to Harrogate where she is to watch the last night of a play produced by an acquaintance. But it seems murders follow her around and she finds the body of a local businessman, Laurence Milner, as she leaves the theatre. This brings her into contact again with Inspector Charles from Scotland Yard who featured in Kate's previous case Dying in the Wool (Kate Shackleton Crime Story)

I really enjoyed this quite complex and far ranging story. It is narrated by Kate herself for the most part but there are some chapters which reveal other parts of the story to the reader. There are many twists and turns before everyone's secrets are revealed and both for the reader and for Kate it is not always easy to see who can be trusted and who can't. I can empathise with Kate and the restrictions placed on women in that era in spite of their newly acquired right to vote. In some ways Kate is fortunate being a widow as she has rather fewer restrictions on her than others have. Even so, reputation is all and she has to be careful what she does.

I like the author's style of writing and it makes a refreshing change to find a book set in other parts of the country than London. Most of the action in the book takes place in and around Harrogate and Kate herself lives near Leeds. This book is well worth reading if you want a crime novel which is a little out of the ordinary - I recommend it.
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse