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4.3 out of 5 stars
82
4.3 out of 5 stars
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£6.99
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on 18 July 2010
LOVED IT. Well done Rob, very inspirational book for cyclists and non-cyclist, everyone should read it. Only wish the book was longer as I slowed at the end to make it last longer.
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on 19 December 2011
As a cyclist of long standing and a great fan of books by Anne Mustoe and Jose Dew; I was keen to read this book.

I found it inspiring and really wanted to be there riding with him. Though would prefer slightly warmer climate the views must have been wonderful.

His reference to Christianity made the book seem more personal and did not detract from his journey in any way. If there is anyone out there who could go through what he has and not think about their God; well, I have yet to meet them.

I am sure this book will be a well thumbed copy. It is so good I am getting one as a Christmas present for my cousin.

His relationship with his friend,his honesty about his abilities, and his discription of events help the reader be in the situation with him. I am looking forward to his next book............. When did you say that was coming out January?

It would be a good idea if your next book can be put in audio as well as kindle. Sometimes I am too tired at the end of a ride to read so just listen to an audio book.
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on 5 August 2011
Why cycle home from Siberia? Why not Tokyo, Hong Kong, Sydney? Well, it's not the places that really matter, it's the journey, and one of his mates (who happens to be cycling the world) is due in Siberia soon, so Rob decides to join him for the journey home.
Rob is quite a personable chap although, as he himself admits, he can become quite annoying when he starts going on a Christian kick. Fortunately he, or his editor, have kept the "born again" verbiage to the minimum and we're allowed to enjoy the adventure for what it is. And it's one of those that you're kind of glad he did, while you sat at home reading about it in the comfort of your armchair. I did often wonder what exactly it was that he thought he was getting out of it as the journey continued almost without a serious destination in mind? Mind you, this was probably envy that he was doing something that a lot of us would love to do, just for the simple reason of broadening our limited horizons and seeing if we could.
The journey soon becomes a bit of an obsession as Rob changes and extends his planned route, while his mate branches out on a different road home (largely because the two of them find themselves soon getting on each other's wicks as they try and travel together.)
I had the feeling that some of the journey's chapters could have been books in themselves. Siberia itself could have been padded out with a history of the Road of Bones, Japan is always fascinating, Papua New Guinea an adventure on its own. Four months in Australia, however, probably warranted the four pages it is given. Still, that's a lot more than the thousand mile trek through Thailand and Malaysia gets, which is covered in a paragraph with passing mentions of palm trees and rice fields. Cambodia - there's another book, but the writing is as restless as Rob is on the bike. If he's not pushing on, he's nowhere.
As expected, Rob detours off into Afghanistan against everybody's advice against doing it. This is a challenge he feels, for some reason, he has to take and he spends most of this leg in a state of subdued fear. Once he's across, however, the book speeds towards home, and countries flash past in sentences. Only Iran gets anywhere near a special mention, but at least he takes some time to ruminate on the obnoxious French in the final pages.
In the last chapter, Rob becomes introspective as he wonders what it was all about? Why did he do it? What did he learn? You'll have to read the book to find out, but it's worth doing it.
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on 11 January 2013
I picked this book up following a review in the Times Educational Supplement. At the time I was teaching geography in a secondary school so had an immediate affinity with Rob Liwall. His drive, sense of adventure and need for more out of life is an inspiration. He will have some stories to tell his grandchildren...so long as they don't read the book first.

Thoroughly recommended.
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on 25 March 2013
This is one of the great cycling adventures. It is truly inspiring to see how Mr. Lilwall goes through the hardships on a such great journey. I also recommend reading Alastair Humphrey's around the World book duo. Mr. Lilwall tells their Siberian experience in more detail, though.
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on 8 March 2012
This is an honest and powerful account of a great old-fashioned adventure. From the predictably sub-zero temperatures of Siberia to the dangerous wilds of Indonesia, Rob just keeps ploughing onwards with humility, introspection and humour in equal measure.
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on 7 January 2011
I'm currently reading this book and although the adventure is amazing, the references to religion and prayer are pretty intrusive. Indeed, while Rob has humility and an engaging style, when he faces dangers he prays, yet when unfortunate events occur the acts of his god are not questioned.

The cover and the introduction do not mention the strong strand of Christianity running through this book, which I think is quite misleading. So, if you are not interested in the Alpha course, I'd recommend a different title.
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on 6 October 2009
This book is brilliant! I didn't think I was the Travel adventure type and wasn't sure I'd get in to it, but I found this totally gripping and couldn't put it down. Very exciting, entertaining, moving and well written.
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on 13 October 2010
A true adventure, showing what can be achieved with enthusiasm, courage, a tight budget, and plenty of time. Filled with insight into the personal struggles faced, and complimented by the accounts of unexpected help from generous local people along the journey. Occasionally there is a bit too much religion for my tastes, but I appreciated that the author includes this more as his observations and thoughts after particular events, rather than trying to persuade the reader along the same path.
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on 20 March 2011
He comes across as very young, naive and rather wet for much of the book. He goes to Siberia with a bike and tent without having camped before, falls out with his mate almost straight away (who sounds a lot more interesting), pisses off various jungle guides and cycles through Japan on a diet mainly of 2 litre tubs of cheap icecream. He obviously really digs telling us about giving lectures about his travels to school kids on the way and the book often comes across like this. He gets to sleep for free on people's floors across Japan, Australia and Korea, simply by exploiting his churchy friends' generosity. While he lives like a church mouse, his successful businesswoman girlfriend flies back and forth frequently to see him, whilst he is keen to remind us of their Christian chasteness. There is some good, interesting narrative and cycle-specific interest in here, but there's a lot of rubbish to hack through to get to that, and frankly there are plenty of better travel and better cycle books out there.
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